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Is there anyone here who disagrees that:

JLabel lbl;
lbl = new JLabel ("a label");

is equivalent to:

JLabel lbl = new JLabel ("a label");

I guess not?

Mind you - this is related to the following question:

public class Test 
extends JApplet
{
    JLabel lbl;
    lbl = new JLabel ("a label");
    public void init() 
    {
    }
}

This code (A) gives the following error:

Syntax error on token ";", , expected

However, this code (B) works perfectly:

public class Test 
extends JApplet
{
    JLabel lbl = new JLabel ("a label");
    public void init() 
    {
    }
}

Any idea why this happens? This may have to do with the init method. I'm still looking forward to see mathematical-precise explanations rather than interpretable theories. Thanks a lot. I'm new with applets. PS: I left out the package import (e.g. import javax.swing.*; ) for simplicity.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't have free instructions like these in the class body. The class body can contain methods, field declarations, constructors, inner classes declarations, static and instance initializer blocks, but not free instructions like this.

You could do

JLabel lbl;

{
    lbl = new JLabel ("a label");
}

but it's ugly.

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Free instructions - what do you mean? Thanks. If you refer to the empty init method, I just removed it and still get the error in code A. –  Sam Dec 27 '12 at 11:46
1  
I don't know the exact term. A declaration is OK in a class body. A method also is. But assigning someting to a field, out of a declaration, method, constructor or initializer block is invalid. –  JB Nizet Dec 27 '12 at 11:48
1  
@JBNizet means that in the first case you have a variable declaration and an instruction that happens to be a variable initialization. In the second case you have a variable definition that is equivalent in terms of result but not in terms of syntax (is equal but not identical). Java syntax definition does not allow instructions outside block but allows variable definitions. –  OnaBai Dec 27 '12 at 11:53

It should be the same, IF it is used in a method:

public void setMethod() {
    JLabel lbl;
    lbl = new JLabel ("a label");
}
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Answer from JB Nizet was an eye opener; the other two exemplified so well they made me understand this fully. Thanks all! –  Sam Dec 27 '12 at 12:40

It has nothing to do with applet or init() method. You can have instructions only inside method body or blocks (lbl = new JLabel ("a label"); without declaration is an instruction)

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