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I have created 3 variables a,b,c. I have assigned values to a and b and have also made a textbox. What I want to do is enter the name of a the variable in the textbox and click the button, then the textbox should should display the value assigned to that variable. It maybe very simple but I do not know what I did wrong.

Here is the FIDDLE

<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            function display(){
                var a = 2;
                var b = 3;
                var c = document.getElementById("b1").value;       
                document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML=c;
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>

        <input type="text" id="b1">
        <button type="button" onclick="display()">Display</button>
        <p id="demo">Update Value.</p>

    </body>
</html> 

share|improve this question
    
Example: If i enter a and click the button ..then it should display 2 – rohan_vg Dec 27 '12 at 11:51
1  
Mmm no it shouldn't, not with that code, it should display : a, you need to have a switch statement or something to say that you want to replace the value of the field with the value of one of your variables – wakooka Dec 27 '12 at 11:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your easiest choice would be to assign your variables to a object, like this:

var vars;

function display() {
    var value = document.getElementById("b1").value;
    vars = {
        a: 2,
        b: 3,
        c: value
    }
    if (vars.hasOwnProperty(value)) { // If the entered value is a variable name
        document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = vars[value]; // Display the variable
    } else { // Otherwise
        document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = value; // display the value
    }
}

Working example

The if/else can be replaced with this, to make it a little shorter:

document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = vars.hasOwnProperty(value) // If
                                                ? vars[value]          // Then
                                                : vars.c;              // Else
share|improve this answer

Try this way:

<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            function display(){
                var a = 2;
                var b = 3;
                var c = document.getElementById("b1").value;
                if(c==a){
                    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML='a';
                }
                if(c==b){
                    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML='b';
                }
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <input type="text" id="b1">
        <button type="button" onclick="display()">Display</button>
        <p id="demo">Update value.</p>
    </body>
</html>

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
While this works, it's not very flexible. When a variable is added, you'd have to add a if statement also. Also, use if/else's, or a switch / case statement, otherwise all those if statements will be evaluated while only one can ever be true – Cerbrus Dec 27 '12 at 12:03

What you are looking for is the eval() method (Which, do a quick google search, it is not recommended).

    <script>
        function display(){
            var a = 2;
            var b = 3;
            var c = document.getElementById("b1").value;       
            document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML=(eval(c));
            // if user enters b in the input field, then the html in demo will be 3
            // if user enters a in the input field, then the html in demo will be 2
        }
    </script>

Again, not recommended!

share|improve this answer
    
There are other ways to do this. Directly using eval on user input is just asking for someone to mess with your code. – Cerbrus Dec 27 '12 at 12:05
    
Downvote is unnecessary since it is the answer that the op was looking for. I made 2 remarks for him to research eval before using it. – Tim Joyce Dec 27 '12 at 12:07
    
If an OP is looking for something that can be done in more than one way, it's usually a good idea to suggest a tweak in the OP's code if that means removing huge security issues. eval is more often than not reason enough for a downvote, since there are often alternatives. Also, users tend to copy code without doing further research. At the very least, explain why eval is evil, instead of suggesting to use it, and telling a OP to look for a reason he shouldn't. – Cerbrus Dec 27 '12 at 12:13
    
It's a good thing for developers to know the best and worst practices. We all know that eval is bad, except people asking questions like this. Now OP knows too. – Tim Joyce Dec 27 '12 at 12:21
1  
I'll just link to an article explaining why eval's evil, here. Saves users from searching ;-) – Cerbrus Dec 27 '12 at 12:25

If you declare variables directly in you script-element they are created as properties of the window-object and can be accessed as such. Thus just update your script like the following to show the contents of the variables:

<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            var a = 2, b = 3;
            function display() {
                var strVarName = document.getElementById('b1').value;
                if(window.hasOwnProperty(strVarName)) {
                    document.getElementById('demo').innerHTML = window[strVarName];
                } else {
                    document.getElementById('demo').innerHTML = 'Variable ' + strVarName + ' does not exist.'
                }
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <input type="text" id="b1">
        <button type="button" onclick="display()">Display</button>
        <p id="demo">Update Value.</p>
    </body>
</html>

This won't work if you declare the variables inside the display function, but this doesn't seem like a thing you would do if this code were to be used in a system to anything beside this one simple function.

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