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I have a StringBuilder that accumulates code. In some cases, it has 2 empty lines between code blocks, and I'd like to make that 1 empty line.
How can I check if the current code already has an empty line at the end? (I prefer not to use its ToString() method because of performance issues.)

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You will either have to check the lines/blocks as you add them - or replace all "double new lines" with a single one, and trim the end. –  Dave Bish Dec 27 '12 at 12:12
1  
Could use Replace and replace any occurrence of two Environment.NewLine with a single Environment.NewLine (this at the end of the building). another possibility is ToString(length-1,1) to get the final character. –  Eyal H Dec 27 '12 at 12:14
    
This is what I did eventually. It was posted as answer but was deleted because someone mentioned that it will also remove double new lines in the middle of the code. It really doesn't matter to me, so if this solution will be posted as an answer, I'll mark it. –  Noich Dec 30 '12 at 6:18
    
I saw that the question was voted down. Too bad that no feedback was given as to what is wrong and can be improved. –  Noich Dec 30 '12 at 13:54

7 Answers 7

You can access any character of your StringBuilder with its index, like you would with a String.

var sb = new StringBuilder();
sb.Append("Hello world!\n");
Console.WriteLine(sb[sb.Length - 1] == '\n'); // True
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I'm talking about huge code chunks. I tried checking the finishing characters but it got messy. –  Noich Dec 27 '12 at 12:45

You can normalize the newlines, using a regex:

var test = @"hello

moop

hello";

var regex = new Regex(@"(?:\r\n|[\r\n])+");

var newLinesNormalized = regex.Replace(test, Environment.NewLine);

output:

hello
moop
hello
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Here is the complete example.

class string_builder
{
    string previousvalue = null;
    StringBuilder sB;
    public string_builder()
    {
        sB = new StringBuilder();
    }
    public void AppendToStringBuilder(string new_val)
    {
        if (previousvalue.EndsWith("\n") &&  !String.IsNullOrEmpty(previousvalue) )
        {
            sB.Append(new_val);
        }
        else
        {
            sB.AppendLine(new_val);
        }

        previousvalue = new_val;
    }

}
class Program
{

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string_builder sb = new string_builder();            
        sb.AppendToStringBuilder("this is line1\n");
        sb.AppendToStringBuilder("this is line2");
        sb.AppendToStringBuilder("\nthis is line3\n");

    }            
}
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This will require a huge change in my code - I wish to keep the changes to minimum. Thanks for the code sample though. –  Noich Dec 30 '12 at 6:16

In some cases, it has 2 empty lines between code blocks, and I'd like to make that 1 empty line [...] I prefer not to use its ToString() method because of performance issues.

First of all you should ask yourself why the newlines are there. If you can control the input while adding the text, you can easily define how many enters get entered:

void AddToStringBuilder(string input)
{
    input = input.TrimStart('\r', '\n');
    input = input.TrimEnd('\r', '\n');

    _stringBuilder.AppendLine(input);
}

Or, if you want to look at the previously added part without calling ToString():

string _previousInput = null;

void AddToStringBuilder(string input)
{
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_previousInput)
        && _previousInput.EnsWith('\n'))
    {
        _stringBuilder.Append(input);
    }
    else
    {
        _stringBuilder.AppendLine(input);
    }

    _previousInput = input;     
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since I don't care about 2 empty lines in the middle of the code, the simplest way is to use

myCode.Replace(string.Format("{0}{0}", Environment.NewLine),Environment.NewLine);

This option doesn't require any changes to classes that use the code accumulator.

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In-case anyone ends up here like I did here is a general method to check the end of a StringBuilder for an arbitrary string with having to use ToString on it.

public static bool EndsWith(this StringBuilder haystack, string needle)
{
    var needleLength = needle.Length - 1;
    var haystackLength = haystack.Length - 1;
    if (haystackLength < needleLength)
    {
        return false;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < needleLength; i++)
    {
        if (haystack[haystackLength - i] != needle[needleLength - i])
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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Single line check. Uses a string type, not StringBuilder, but you should get the basic idea.

if (theString.Substring(theString.Length - Environment.NewLine.Length, Environment.NewLine.Length).Contains(Environment.NewLine))
{
     //theString does end with a NewLine
}
else
{
     //theString does NOT end with a NewLine
}
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