Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I faced a very wierd problem that in my db i set my id as primary key and it stores those ids too that are identical e.g:

+--------+
|   ID   |
+--------+
|  ABC94 |
|  ABC94 |
+--------+

When I deleted them then from phpmyadmin, then it generates following queries for deletion in which you can see one id contains \r which makes its unique but is not visible on select view. Kindly let me know how can i make sure when ids are getting saved then it should only take ABC94 part and ignore any parts like \r or \d or the like . Thanks,

DELETE FROM `Db` WHERE `ID` = 'ABC94\r';
DELETE FROM `DB` WHERE `ID` = 'ABC94';

I tried following code but it gave me error due to \ i guess cause it worked fine when i used - instead of \

SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX( "ABC94\r",  "\", 1 )
share|improve this question
    
how did you insert those records? –  John Woo Dec 27 '12 at 12:32
    
@JW. dump csv file to db, but i also moved after dumping the data to another table so i can apply the ignoring part while moving –  soft genic Dec 27 '12 at 12:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there is any possibility of extra white space, you must handle it either in your application code before insert, or trim it off with the RDBMS at INSERT time.

INSERT INTO `Db` (`ID`) VALUES (TRIM('input value'))

You cannot update your existing rows without key violations unless you devise a scheme of replacing whites pace with other printable characters.

For example, replace the carriage return characters with x, and they will still be unique:

/* Global replacement of carriage returns with 'x' */
UPDATE `Db` SET `ID` = REPLACE(`ID`, '\r', 'x')

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/string-functions.html#function_trim

Your attempt with SUBSTRING_INDEX() was nearly valid, but you should have omitted the backslash and instead supplied the empty string ''.

SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX( 'ABC94\r',  '', 1 )

But using TRIM() as I have above is more reliable. If at all possible, the best approach is to fix the source of the input data to avoid generating these in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay kindly let me know why UPDATE table SET id = TRIM( "id/r" ) WHERE id = "Fall97\r" is working fine but not UPDATE table SET id = TRIM( id ) WHERE id = "Fall97\r" –  soft genic Dec 27 '12 at 15:26
    
Do not supply a WHERE clause. Running the update over all rows will trim each, but you cannot do it in place because you will get key violations. In your first example, you are updating to the literal string "id/r" since it is quoted. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 27 '12 at 15:41
    
no i removed the id from my db, like FALL97\r is one id in the table but i am unable to update it by giving any db column if i give simple string the the trik works –  soft genic Dec 27 '12 at 16:00
    
Thanks, i used the replace trick for my query –  soft genic Dec 27 '12 at 16:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.