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why can't my normals_since function see my global variable leaps?? I can't believe that variables declared in main aren't available in the whole program is that what encapsulation or hiding or something means? is it accessible in some secret way like main.z or _main_z ?? my gcc error>>

yrs_since.c: In function ‘normals_since’:
yrs_since.c:40:9: error: ‘leaps’ undeclared (first use in this function)
yrs_since.c:40:9: note: each undeclared identifier is reported only once </p>
for each function it appears in

possible answer
looks like if I want all functions to see the vars, I have to move 
int z; //place holder
int leaps;
int normals;

outside of main and declare them up at the top after the #defines

#include stdio.h>
#include stdlib.h>
#define START_GREG 1582
int yrs_since(int year); //type-declare the function
int leaps_since(int years);
int normals_since(int years);

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    int year = 1599; //local var
    int z; //place holder
    int leaps;
    int normals;
    z = yrs_since(year); //call the function
    leaps = leaps_since(z); //leap years move the doomsday fwd by 2 days
    normals= normals_since(z); //normal years it adjusts one day
    printf("blah blah %d,", z);//print the result
    printf("leap years since 1582:-->> %d  <<", leaps);
    printf("normal years since 1582:-->> %d  <<", normals);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
int yrs_since(year){
    int x;
    x=year-START_GREG;
    return x;
};
int leaps_since (years){
    return years/4;
};

int normals_since(years){
    int x;
    x=years-leaps;
    return x;
};
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1  
leaps is not even a global variable. –  nhahtdh Dec 27 '12 at 13:30
    
Do no terminate the definition of a function with a ; after the trailing }, it is not valid in C. –  ouah Dec 27 '12 at 13:33
    
You might want to format your question into something that is more readable, has only relevant parts of the code, and makes it clear what code is in which source file. –  che Dec 27 '12 at 13:34
    
FWIW: Depending on the country, the Julian Calendar was used well past 1582. Greece adopted the Gregorian Calendar: Thursday, 1 March 1923. You have to take country/locale into account for what you seem to be doing. You seem to assume otherwise. –  jim mcnamara Dec 27 '12 at 19:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Right, as you have found out, variables INSIDE a function are only visible to that function. main is a function just like any other function, it is not treated in any special way.

Global variables are declared OUTSIDE of functions (but it's generally good advice to avoid global functions, in general.

The solution, if you want to avoid global variables, is to pass the variable from main into the function using the variable.

For example:

int normals_since(int years, int leaps){
    int x;
    x=years-leaps;
    return x;
};

Note that I added "int" to the years variable. Whilst old-style C is still allowed in some compilers, it's definitely recommended to use ANSI standard (add -ansi -strict -Wall -std=c99 to your gcc command line to give you warnings for "things you may have done wrong" and errors for not following ANSI standard)

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Variables declared in main() are visible only to main() itself. You either need to move these variables into global scope (outside of all functions) or pass pointers to them into your other functions.

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Because you have defined leaps inside the body of function main(). If you want it to be truly global, define it outside the main() function, e.g., right below the prototype:

int normals_since(int years);
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Possible answer: Looks like if I want all functions to see the vars, I have to move

int z; //place holder
int leaps;
int normals;

outside of main and declare them up at the top after the #defines.

share|improve this answer

Any var declared inside a block is not defined out side the block.
There is nothing to believe, it's the way it works (also in other programming languages).
If you want a global var - declare it outside of all blocks.

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