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I'm wrapping an Obj-C api which uses blocks for callbacks using MonoDevelop. I managed to connect my C# delegates into a block in Objective-C and it works fine as long as I decorate them with [MonoPInvokeCallback] so it compiles AOT.

That's all fine until a block returns a class instance. This gives me back into C# a pointer to the class (IntPtr in my implementation). Usually when the methods I call from Obj-C return this pointer I wrap the handle with my own managed class and call all the methods from there - providing a nice C# interface for the wrapped handle. In this specific case, the IntPtr is called straight into the user-made callback so I don't get the chance to wrap it nicely.

delegate void GetUserCallback(User user);

//User callback
[MonoPInvokeCallback (typeof (GetUserCallback))]
void PrintUserName(User user) {
    Console.WriteLine(user.name);
}

void GetUserById (int id, GetUserCallback callback) {
    ApiGetUserById(id, callback);
}

Now this doesn't work as I can't get the managed User class from Objective-C. I instead get a pointer to an unmanaged User class. So it works like so:

delegate void GetUserCallbackPtr(IntPtr userPtr);

//User callback
[MonoPInvokeCallback (typeof (GetUserCallbackPtr))]
unsafe void PrintUserName(IntPtr userPtr) {
    User user = new User(userPtr);
    Console.WriteLine(user.name);
}

void GetUserById (int id, GetUserCallbackPtr callback) {
    ApiGetUserById(id, callback);
}

This can work but it's ugly in 2 ways: 1. It requires the user to specifically declare "unsafe", the attribute (which can't be prevented) AND actually pass the pointer to the wrapping class so he/she'll have a nice C# interface to "User".

I tried doing this: On the method that calls the API and providing the callback, create a new callback which gets the IntPtr, wraps it, and uses it to call the original - for example like so:

delegate void GetUserCallback(User user);
delegate void GetUserCallbackPtr(IntPtr userPtr);

//User callback
void PrintUserName(User user) {
    Console.WriteLine(user.name);
}

void GetUserById (int id, GetUserCallback callback) {
    ApiGetUserById(id, InnerCallback);
}

[MonoPInvokeCallback (typeof (GetUserCallbackPtr))]
void InnerCallback(IntPtr userPtr) {
    // How do I run the original "callback" from here?
}

Can't run the callback. So I tried anonymous delegate (or lambda):

delegate void GetUserCallback(User user);
delegate void GetUserCallbackPtr(IntPtr userPtr);

//User callback
void PrintUserName(User user) {
    Console.WriteLine(user.name);
}

void GetUserById (int id, GetUserCallback callback) {
    ApiGetUserById(id, delegate(IntPtr userPtr) {
        callback(userPtr);
    });
}

This also doesn't work because the anonymous delegate isn't decorated with the MonoPInvokeCallback attribute and it's compiled JIT which doesn't work on iphone.

I couldn't find any other way to solve it other than making the user specifically wrap the pointer him/herself which doesn't satisfy me. Thought about using a static array for storing the callbacks but I can't really match the returned inner callback to the callback I want to call (or can I?)

Any suggestions? :)

EDIT: I guess i'm just trying add a callback bridge between the original callback and the caller - like a middleman. But I can't do this with anonymous delegates. Is there a way to do that?

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