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I'm currently studying the Observer pattern and I've come across some confusion.

When I read this line of code:

IObserverSubscribe user1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();

I think the interface IObserverSubscribe user1 is creating and instantiating new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser(). That is a little confusing to me because usually the same class that is being declared is also instantiating. Should it be like this:

IObserverSubscribe user1= new IObserverSubscribe();

Why is the interface decoration able to instantiate a another class?

Full code below:

Main:

package observerpattern;

public class ObserverPattern {

    /**
     * The observer pattern is a software design pattern in which
     *  an object, called the subject, maintains a list of its dependents,
     *  called observers, and notifies them automatically of any 
     *  state changes, usually by calling one of their methods.
     *  It is mainly used to implement distributed event handling systems.
     *  The Observer pattern is also a key part in the familiar
     *  Model View Controller (MVC) architectural pattern. 
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        SubjectYouTubeChannel sytc= new SubjectYouTubeChannel();// create youtube channel
        IObserverSubscribe user1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();
        IObserverSubscribe user2= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();
        IObserverSubscribe moderator1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeModerator();

        sytc.Subscribe(user1);
        sytc.Subscribe(user2);
        sytc.Subscribe(moderator1);
        sytc.Unsubscribe(user2);

        sytc.notifySubscribers();


    }

}

subject:

package observerpattern;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import observerpattern.IObserverSubscribe;

public class SubjectYouTubeChannel {    
    private List<IObserverSubscribe> subscribers = new ArrayList<IObserverSubscribe>(); 
    public void Subscribe(IObserverSubscribe ios){
        subscribers.add(ios);       
    }   
    public void Unsubscribe(IObserverSubscribe ios){        
        subscribers.remove(ios);
    }   
    public void notifySubscribers(){        
        for(IObserverSubscribe ios : subscribers ){         
            ios.Notify();           
        }       
    }
}

Interface Observer:

package observerpattern;

public interface IObserverSubscribe {

    void Notify();

}

Concrete Observer:

package observerpattern;

public class ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser implements IObserverSubscribe{

    @Override
    public void Notify() {
        System.out.println("User watches video, comments, ect");

    }

}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted
new IObserverSubscribe();

This is illegal because you cannot instantiate an interface - they by definition do not have any ... definitions of their methods.

IObserverSubscribe user1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();

The left side here says that user1 is of type atleast IObserverSubscribe, i.e points to an instance whose type implements the interface.

The right side on the other hand actually creates an instance of a concrete type and assigns to user1. This is possible because the concrete type implements the interface.

share|improve this answer
2  
while OP didn't mention it, it is also possible to use an anonymous inner type to declare an implementation of an interface. – edthethird Dec 27 '12 at 16:46

IObserverSubscribe user1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser(); I think the interface IObserverSubscribe user1 is creating and instantiating new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser(). That is a little confusing to me because usually the same class that is being declared is also instantiating. Should it be like this:

IObserverSubscribe user1= new IObserverSubscribe();

Nope, you can't instantiate Interfaces.

IObserverSubscribe user1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();

This creates an instance of ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser which is a sub-class(or implementing class) of IObserverSubscribe.

share|improve this answer

Think about what an interface does and what the observer pattern is meant to be used for.

ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser implements the IObserverSubscribe interface because it needs to guarantee that it has the "Notify()" method. All classes that are supposed to be "IObserverSubscribers" therefore need to do something in particular when they are notified.

If you could do the following, it would defeat the purpose of the observer pattern:

 IObserverSubscribe user1= new IObserverSubscribe();

A youtube moderator and a youtube user have different capabilities so you cannot use the same Notify method for both (see modified code below):

User Class:

 package observerpattern;

 public class ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser implements IObserverSubscribe{ 

     @Override
     public void Notify() {
         sendEmail("A new video was added! It might be a cat video, so you should " +
       "probably view it, vote on it, comment on it, or ignore it.");

     }
     @Override
     public void watchVideo(Video v) {
       //...
     }
     @Override
     public void giggleAtCatVideo() {
         //..
     }


 }

Moderator class:

 package observerpattern;

 public class ConcreteObserverYoutubeModerator implements IObserverSubscribe{    
     @Override
     public void Notify() {
         sendEmail("New video added, see if it should be deleted or if there is copyright infringement.");
     } 
     @Override
     public void deleteVideo(Video v) {
         //..
     }
 }

Why is that useful? Well because you can make another class (in this case, SubjectYouTubeChannel) that can hold objects that implement the "IObserverSubscribe" interface. When something about that subject changes you can notify every observer that's associated with that subject so that all the observers will know something has changed.

A better example would be if SubjectYouTubeChannel had an "addVideo" method (see below) and the notify method in the moderator class and user class sent different emails to them alerting them to the change.

package observerpattern;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import observerpattern.IObserverSubscribe;

public class SubjectYouTubeChannel {    
    private List<IObserverSubscribe> subscribers = new ArrayList<IObserverSubscribe>(); 
    public void Subscribe(IObserverSubscribe ios){
        subscribers.add(ios);       
    }   
    public void Unsubscribe(IObserverSubscribe ios){        
        subscribers.remove(ios);
    }   
    public void notifySubscribers(){        
        for(IObserverSubscribe ios : subscribers ){         
            ios.Notify();           
        }       
     }
 public void addVideo(Video v){
     //... video add code
        notifySubscribers();
 }
 }

This means you can do cool things like this:

 package observerpattern;

 public class ObserverPattern {

    /**
     * The observer pattern is a software design pattern in which
     *  an object, called the subject, maintains a list of its dependents,
     *  called observers, and notifies them automatically of any 
     *  state changes, usually by calling one of their methods.
     *  It is mainly used to implement distributed event handling systems.
     *  The Observer pattern is also a key part in the familiar
     *  Model View Controller (MVC) architectural pattern. 
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        SubjectYouTubeChannel sytc= new SubjectYouTubeChannel();// create youtube channel
        IObserverSubscribe user1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();
        IObserverSubscribe user2= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeUser();
        IObserverSubscribe moderator1= new ConcreteObserverYoutubeModerator();
        Video v = new Video() //imagine that class exists

        sytc.Subscribe(user1);
        sytc.Subscribe(user2);
        sytc.Subscribe(moderator1);
        sytc.Unsubscribe(user2);

        sytc.addVideo(v);
    //notifySubscribers() is called within SubjectYouTubeChannel's addVideo() so
    //all users and moderators who subscribe to the channel have been notified with 
    //messages corresponding to what they should do

    }
 }
share|improve this answer

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