Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created a simple animation with raphaeljs. You can take a look at it here: http://jsfiddle.net/fJt96/

It generates random fractal plants and blends between them. It will take about 8 seconds before the second plant is shown and then about 4 seconds for each refresh depending on the plants complexity. The rules for creating one of the drawings are explained in the description of this sample (not made by me) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fractal-plant.svg

In my code the functions applyRules and draw are more or less direct translations from the description to javascript.

Unfortunately there's a memory leak in my script and I can't figure out where. The only variables that are persistent are the RaphaelPaper and two RaphaelSets as well as one boolean toggle. Each set holds one fractal plant and the toggle stores which set is currently shown and which can be redrawn. The rest of the program relies on local variables but still somewhere there's a memory leak.

I have two ideas

  • I am removing the elements from a set as it is redrawn. Is it sufficient to call Element.remove for each Element of the set?

  • Is there maybe a memory leak in Raphael? I don't want to appear rude - the inventor of Raphael is certainly an ingenious mastermind but I can't find the problem in my code. Maybe there is some known issue ?

UPDATE: here's the code

    var toggle = true;
window.onload = function () {
    var paper = Raphael(10, 50, 1000, 1000);
    var word = "X";
    paper.clear();
    var n = 4;
    for(var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        word = applyRules(word);
    }
    var set1 = paper.set();
    draw(paper, word, set1);
    set1.attr("fill", "green");
    set1.attr("stroke", "green");
    set1.attr("opacity", "1");
    var set2 = paper.set();
    draw(paper, word, set2);
    set2.attr("fill", "green");
    set2.attr("stroke", "green");
    set2.attr("opacity", "0");
    var toggle = true;
    var interval = window.setInterval(function () {
        return redraw(paper, set1, set2);
    }, 3000);
};
var remove = function (Element) {
    Element.remove();
};
var redraw = function (paper, set1, set2) {
    var n = 3 + Math.floor(Math.random() * 4);
    var word = "X";
    for(var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        word = applyRules(word);
    }
    var length = 2 + Math.floor(Math.random() * 2);
    var deltaRot = 15 + Math.floor(Math.random() * 20);
    if(toggle) {
        set2.attr("opacity", "1");
        set1.forEach(remove);
        draw(paper, word, set1, deltaRot, length);
        set1.attr("fill", "green");
        set1.attr("stroke", "green");
        set1.attr("opacity", "0");
        toggle = !toggle;
    } else {
        set1.attr("opacity", "1");
        set2.forEach(remove);
        draw(paper, word, set2, deltaRot, length);
        set2.attr("fill", "green");
        set2.attr("stroke", "green");
        set2.attr("opacity", "0");
        toggle = !toggle;
    }
};
var Entry = (function () {
    function Entry() { }
    return Entry;
})();
var List = (function () {
    function List() { }
    return List;
})();
var draw = function (paper, word, st, deltaRot, length) {
    if (typeof deltaRot === "undefined") { deltaRot = 25; }
    if (typeof length === "undefined") { length = 2; }
    var x = 0;
    var y = 0;
    var rot = 45;
    var stack = new List();
    for(var i = 0; i < word.length; i++) {
        var char = word[i];
        switch(char) {
            case "F": {
                var xend = x + Math.cos(rot / 180 * Math.PI) * length;
                var yend = y + Math.sin(rot / 180 * Math.PI) * length;
                st.push(paper.path("M" + x + "," + y + "L" + xend + "," + yend));
                x = xend;
                y = yend;
                break;

            }
            case "+": {
                rot = rot + deltaRot;
                break;

            }
            case "-": {
                rot = rot - deltaRot;
                break;

            }
            case "X": {
                break;

            }
            case "[": {
                var current = new Entry();
                current.Rot = rot;
                current.X = x;
                current.Y = y;
                var newlist = new List();
                newlist.head = current;
                newlist.tail = stack;
                stack = newlist;
                break;

            }
            case "]": {
                st.push(paper.circle(x, y, 1));
                var current = stack.head;
                x = current.X;
                y = current.Y;
                rot = current.Rot;
                stack = stack.tail;
                break;

            }
        }
    }
};
var applyRules = function (word) {
    var new_word = "";
    for(var i = 0; i < word.length; i++) {
        var char = word[i];
        switch(char) {
            case "X": {
                new_word = new_word + "F-[[X]+X]+F[+FX]-X";
                break;

            }
            case "F": {
                new_word = new_word + "FF";
                break;

            }
            case "+": {
                new_word = new_word + "+";
                break;

            }
            case "-": {
                new_word = new_word + "-";
                break;

            }
            case "[": {
                new_word = new_word + "[";
                break;

            }
            case "]": {
                new_word = new_word + "]";
                break;

            }
        }
    }
    return new_word;
};‚Äč

I guess the usage of List and Entry will be slightly confusing. I created this with Typescript and wrote a custom List implementation. Here's some Typescript

class Entry { public X: number; public Y: number; public Rot: number;}

class List { public head: Entry; public tail: List; }
share|improve this question
    
Can you copy the code into the question - so it's easier to look at the code undistracted? –  user568458 Dec 27 '12 at 16:13
    
sure, one moment –  lhk Dec 27 '12 at 16:15
    
Element.remove() is an extremely costly call why are you using it, I did not get my head round your code yet... –  Chasbeen Dec 27 '12 at 16:45
1  
Chasbeen, I need to remove the old fractal and draw a new one, Is there an alternative to element.remove ? –  lhk Dec 27 '12 at 17:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.