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I have an object with several properties. I would like to remove any properties that have falsy values.

This can be achieved with compact on arrays, but what about objects?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 31 down vote accepted

You could make your own underscore plugin (mixin) :

_.mixin({
  compactObject: function(o) {
    _.each(o, function(v, k) {
      if(!v) {
        delete o[k];
      }
    });
    return o;
  }
});

And then use it as a native underscore method :

var o = _.compactObject({
  foo: 'bar',
  a: 0,
  b: false,
  c: '',
  d: null,
  e: undefined
});

Update

As @AndreiNeculau pointed out, this mixin affects the original object, while the original compact underscore method returns a copy of the array.
To solve this issue and make our compactObject behave more like it's cousin, here's a minor update:

_.mixin({
  compactObject : function(o) {
     var clone = _.clone(o);
     _.each(clone, function(v, k) {
       if(!v) {
         delete clone[k];
       }
     });
     return clone;
  }
});
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1  
Since the question has an underscore reference, it would be good to mention that this does not behave like _.compact. It will delete properties, rather than create a shallow clone with truthy values only. See stackoverflow.com/a/19750822/465684 below –  Andrei Neculau Mar 5 '14 at 19:00
    
@AndreiNeculau You're right! I seem to have missed that earlier. See my updated answer. –  gion_13 Mar 5 '14 at 21:18
2  
Why first copy all the properties of an object, then loop through them and delete falsy ones? That's unperformant. Moreover, using delete is generally discouraged as it immediately exposes properties with the same name from the prototype chain and also hurts performance due to "hidden classes" (V8) - changing the object structure causes the engine to do extra work. The best and shortest solution would be _.pick(o, _.identity). –  Radko Dinev Oct 7 '14 at 12:31

Since Underscore version 1.7.0, you can use _.pick:

_.pick(sourceObj, _.identity)

Explanation

The second parameter to _.pick can be a predicate function for selecting values. Values for which the predicate returns truthy are picked, and values for which the predicate returns falsy are ignored.

pick _.pick(object, *keys)

Return a copy of the object, filtered to only have values for the whitelisted keys (or array of valid keys). Alternatively accepts a predicate indicating which keys to pick.

_.identity is a helper function that returns its first argument, which means it also works as a predicate function that selects truthy values and rejects falsy ones. The Underscore library also comes with a bunch of other predicates, for instance _.pick(sourceObj, _.isBoolean) would retain only boolean properties.

If you use this technique a lot, you might want to make it a bit more expressive:

var pickNonfalsy = _.partial(_.pick, _, _.identity); // Place this in a library module or something
pickNonfalsy(sourceObj);

Underscore version 1.6.0 provided _.pick as well, but it didn't accept a predicate function instead of a whitelist.

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With lodash's transform,

_.transform(obj, function(res, v, k) {
  if (v) res[k] = v;
});
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13  
whit lodash's _.pick(obj, _.identity); shorter ^_^ –  evilive Sep 9 '14 at 9:00
    
This answer or @evilive's comment under it IS the answer. –  Radko Dinev Oct 7 '14 at 12:20
1  
a shorter variation, based on the above comment, would be var compactObject = _.partialRight(_.pick, _.identity); –  zaboco Oct 8 '14 at 9:59
Object.keys(o).forEach(function(k) {
    if (!o[k]) {
        delete o[k];
    }
});
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1  
And one can use underscore for .keys and .forEach. –  Felix Kling Dec 27 '12 at 16:58
    
How would this look in Underscore, then? Trying to piece it together… –  Oliver Joseph Ash Dec 27 '12 at 17:02
    
+1 this is awesome man. please give me the link of forEach method of JS –  diEcho May 22 '13 at 12:35
    
2  
+1 for the choice of variable names, OK :) –  Torkil Johnsen Sep 6 '13 at 12:54

You can create a shallow clone:

_(obj).reduce(function(a,v,k){ 
     if(v){ a[k]=v; } 
     return a; 
},{});
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for object use delete.

for(var k in obj){

  if(obj.hasOwnProperty(k) && !obj[k]){
    delete obj[k];
  }
}
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since he wants an underscore solution, you could iterate over the array using one of underscore's methods –  gion_13 Dec 27 '12 at 17:11

To add to gion_13's answer:

_.mixin({
  compactObject : function(o) {
     var newObject = {};
     _.each(o, function(v, k) {
       if(v !== null && v !== undefined) {
         newObject[k] = v
       }
     });
     return newObject;
  }
});

This one creates a new object and adds keys and values instead of cloning everything and deleting key-value pairs. Minor difference.

But more importantly, checks explicitly for null and undefined instead of falsey, which will delete key-value pairs that have false as a value.

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