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I have a lot of files that need one line changed.

Here is the code:

GetOptions ('full' => \$full,
        'dbno=s' => \$dbno,
            'since=s' => \$since,
            'printSQL' => \$printSQL,
            'nwisDB=s' => \$nwisDBOption);

# Find the NWISDB to be extracted

if ($nwisDBOption eq '') {
  $nwisdb = &WSCExtractor::getNwisdb;
} else {
  $nwisdb = uc($nwisDBOption);
}

Here is what I want:

GetOptions ('full' => \$full,
        'dbno=s' => \$dbno,
            'since=s' => \$since,
            'printSQL' => \$printSQL,
            'nwisDB=s' => \$nwisDBOption) || &WSCExtractor::usage();

# Find the NWISDB to be extracted

if ($nwisDBOption eq '') {
  $nwisdb = &WSCExtractor::getNwisdb;
} else {
  $nwisdb = uc($nwisDBOption);
}

Here is the perl command I am using:

perl -pi -e "s/\\\$nwisDBOption\);/\\\$nwisDBOption\) || \&WSCExtractor::usage\(\);/" extractor-template

Here is the result:

GetOptions ('full' => \$full,
        'dbno=s' => \$dbno,
            'since=s' => \$since,
            'printSQL' => \$printSQL,
            'nwisDB=s' => \$nwisDBOption) || &WSCExtractor::usage();

# Find the NWISDB to be extracted

if ($nwisDBOption eq '') {
  $nwisdb = &WSCExtractor::getNwisdb;
} else {
  $nwisdb = uc($nwisDBOption) || &WSCExtractor::usage();
}

It is matching the second instance of $nwisDBOption even though it does not have a \ in front of it. I have tried adding more \ in front in case perl was eating them. It did not match then. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you use double quotes around your perl program string? Are you in windows? If not, don't. When in doubt about shell difficulties, just use a script file instead. –  TLP Dec 27 '12 at 17:03
    
Also, I cannot reproduce your problem in windows. –  TLP Dec 27 '12 at 17:05
    
Running this script in Scientific Linux –  Dan Schwitalla Dec 27 '12 at 17:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm assuming you're on a Unixish OS, not Windows. Since you're using double quotes around your code, the shell is parsing it and — among other things — replacing double backslashes with single one. So the code perl sees is actually not:

s/\\\$nwisDBOption\);/\\\$nwisDBOption\) || \&WSCExtractor::usage\(\);/

but:

s/\$nwisDBOption\);/\$nwisDBOption\) || \&WSCExtractor::usage\(\);/

You can easily confirm this by running the command:

echo "s/\\\$nwisDBOption\);/\\\$nwisDBOption\) || \&WSCExtractor::usage\(\);/"

Anyway, there are a few ways to fix the problem. The ones I'd recommend would be either to use single quotes instead double quotes, or simply to write your code into an actual Perl script file and run it that way.

However, if you really wanted to, you could just double all backslashes in your code.

share|improve this answer
    
I originally had single quotes in the change text so I used double quotes to contain the entire statement. I changed it to single quotes and it worked, thanks. –  Dan Schwitalla Dec 27 '12 at 17:46

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