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I need a way to tell what mode the shell is in from within the shell.

I've tried looking at the platform module but it seems only to tell you about "about the bit architecture and the linkage format used for the executable": the binary is compiled as 64bit though (I'm running on OS X 10.6) so it seems to always report 64bit even though I'm using the methods described here to force 32bit mode).

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1  
Just out of interest: Why do you need to know? –  Lennart Regebro Sep 10 '09 at 15:18
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I'm having problems building and loading some modules on OS X 10.6. Specifically pysco, which is complaining I'm running in 64bit mode. This is under a virtualenv as well so there is some extra complications I need to work through... –  jkp Sep 10 '09 at 17:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 161 down vote accepted

UPDATED: One way is to look at sys.maxsize as documented here:

$ python-32 -c 'import sys;print("%x" % sys.maxsize, sys.maxsize > 2**32)'
('7fffffff', False)
$ python-64 -c 'import sys;print("%x" % sys.maxsize, sys.maxsize > 2**32)'
('7fffffffffffffff', True)

sys.maxsize was introduced in Python 2.6. If you need a test for older systems, this slightly more complicated test should work on all Python 2 and 3 releases:

$ python-32 -c 'import struct;print( 8 * struct.calcsize("P"))'
32
$ python-64 -c 'import struct;print( 8 * struct.calcsize("P"))'
64

BTW, you might be tempted to use platform.architecture() for this. Unfortunately, its results are not always reliable, particularly in the case of OS X universal binaries.

$ arch -x86_64 /usr/bin/python2.6 -c 'import sys,platform; print platform.architecture()[0], sys.maxsize > 2**32'
64bit True
$ arch -i386 /usr/bin/python2.6 -c 'import sys,platform; print platform.architecture()[0], sys.maxsize > 2**32'
64bit False
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6  
+1, sounds like the best approach to me. –  Alex Martelli Sep 10 '09 at 15:23
    
Ha! Why the heck was I banging my head on this one. Great answer! :) –  mkelley33 Jul 4 '10 at 3:55
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Using sys.maxint will not work to detect a 64-bit Python when running Windows (see here). Instead, use struct.calcsize("P") for a cross-platform solution. –  Luke Moore Mar 29 '11 at 17:42
    
Interesting. Does sys.maxsize work for 64-bit Windows? –  Ned Deily Mar 29 '11 at 18:19
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Yes, sys.maxsize works for 64-bit Windows. –  Luke Moore Mar 30 '11 at 14:36

Basically a variant on Matthew Marshall's answer (with struct from the std.library):

import struct
print struct.calcsize("P") * 8
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Imho, better than ctypes version - works even with older Python. –  yk4ever May 2 '10 at 21:34
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This is an elegant solution. –  El Developer Jan 12 '12 at 16:40
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Very useful, can be used in one line. $ python -c 'import struct; print struct.calcsize("P") * 8' –  Sun Liwen Apr 23 '12 at 9:43

When starting the Python interpreter in the terminal/command line you may also see a line like:

Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 14:24:46) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32

Where [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] means 64-bit Python. Works for my particular setup, anyhow.

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This is so much easier than all of the other answers. +1 –  jmort253 Aug 29 '12 at 22:47
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so this is what? 64bit python or 32bit python? –  phpJs Feb 28 '13 at 5:06
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@phpJs 64 bit because of [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] –  Eduard Florinescu Aug 5 '13 at 12:34
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Unfortunately only works for Windows versions of Python. My OSX installation returns Python 2.7.8 (v2.7.8:ee879c0ffa11, Jun 29, 2014, 21:07:35) [GCC 4.2.1 (Apple In. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin –  alexander Aug 13 at 16:12
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On cygwin, you get this answer: Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 25 2014, 14:04:36) [GCC 4.8.3] on cygwin –  Jonno_FTW Nov 10 at 4:15

Try using ctypes to get the size of a void pointer:

import ctypes
print ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp)

It'll be 4 for 32 bit or 8 for 64 bit.

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1  
That works, too, although it does have the possible slight disadvantage of an unnecessary import and module load if you don't otherwise need ctypes: the sys module, otoh, is compiled into the interpreter. –  Ned Deily Sep 10 '09 at 16:32
    
please help me understand: on my 64b installation python -c 'import ctypes; print ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp)' returns 8. Or should it be python -c 'import ctypes; print ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp) * 8' ? –  lukmdo Jul 14 '12 at 11:11
    
The function returns the size in bytes (4 or 8). If you need the size in bits (32 or 64) you have to multiply with 8. b_is_python_64bit = (ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp) == 8) –  phobie Sep 26 '12 at 12:44
    
Just call python -c "import ctypes; print(32 if ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp)==4 else 64, 'bit CPU')" –  Garrett Linux Oct 27 at 20:22

For a non-programmatic solution, look in the Activity Monitor. It lists the architecture of 64-bit processes as “Intel (64-bit)”.

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A very nice alternative answer for those of us using Mac OS 10.x.x Thank you! –  mkelley33 Jul 4 '10 at 4:04
C:\Users\xyz>python

Python 2.7.6 (default, Nov XY ..., 19:24:24) **[MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win
32**
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

after hitting python in cmd

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