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I have this regex: (?<=[.!?])\s[A-Z] I run it on this text:

The engineering plant, weapon and electronic systems, galley, and multitudinous other
equipment required to transform the new hull into an operating and habitable warship are
installed and tested. The prospective commanding officer, ship's officers, the petty
officers, and seamen who will form the crew report for training and intensive
familiarization with their new ship.

It produces:

he engineering plant, weapon and electronic systems, galley, and multitudinous other
equipment required to transform the new hull into an operating and habitable warship are
installed and tested.
he prospective commanding officer, ship's officers, the petty officers, and seamen who
will form the crew report for training and intensive familiarization with their new ship.

As you can see, it removes the first letter of the sentence. It is not because they are capitalized (I tested it).

How do I fix it so it does not remove the first letter of the sentence?

(I'm using Python 3)

I used re.split() and then I printed the array, separating each value with a newline

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1  
You seem to have omitted the actual regex... –  Fred Dec 27 '12 at 18:37
    
What is the regex used? You forgot to add it to your post :) –  Rui Jarimba Dec 27 '12 at 18:37
1  
Also, when you've done that, you should add how you "run" it on that text, and what result you would have expected. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 27 '12 at 18:39
    
@Fred I added it –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 18:41
    
@RuiJarimba I added it –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your regex matches a whitespace character and an uppercase ASCII letter, but only if they are preceded by either a dot, an exclamation mark or a question mark.

When you use it to split the text, the capital letter becomes part of the delimiter used for splitting, and is therefore removed.

Change the regex to

(?<=[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z])

and the letter will not become part of the match.

Be aware, though, of two things:

  1. This will only work if a new sentence starts with as ASCII letter. For most English sentences, you'll probably be OK, but certainly not for other languages.
  2. There may be some false splits if your text contains abbreviations: Mr. Smith and Dr. Jones will be split in two.
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Thank you!! Your explanation made sense too. –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 18:44
    
Stackoverflow says that I "can accept an answer in 6 minutes" –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 18:44
    
How would I match based on [.!?] instead of \s –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 22:04
    
That would remove the punctuation - do you want that? Simple regexes are not the right tool for language processing. Check out nltk.org. The Natural Language Processing Toolkit already contains a sentence separator. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 28 '12 at 6:34

The problem is with your regex, and strangely, while you used a "non consuming token" (ie, a positive lookbehind) for punctuation ((?<=[.!?])), you did not for detecting the first letter of each sentence ([A-Z]).

As a result, the regex you use in split() will consume the first capitalized letter of each match. You probably meant not to consume it (that is, consume only the space inbetween), in which case you want to use a positive lookahead, which does not consume text:

(?<=[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z])

Lookaheads and lookbehinds are anchors in general, and anchors do not consume any text from the input. The most commonly used anchors are, of course, ^ and $. They only match positions in the input text, which is what you want.

A lookbehind will match a position where the preceding text to the position must match/not match the given regex, while a lookahead will match a position where the following text to the position must match/not match the given regex. What you wanted, after a matched space, was a position where what followed was a capital letter, hence the use of a positive lookahead ((?=<re>), where <re> is a regex) matching an uppercase letter (<re> being [A-Z]).

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How would I match based on [.!?] instead of \s? Do I use an anchor? –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 22:05
    
What do you mean by that exactly? Do you mean to remove punctuations and leave the space character alone? –  fge Dec 27 '12 at 22:16
    
I see that [.!?] is in a lookahead, but punctuation is the thing that I am looking for when I split a sentence. Is that bad style? –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 27 '12 at 22:24
    
[.!?] is not in a lookahead but in a lookbehind ((?<=...)). The way the original regex is written, you are looking for a position where the text before the position matches [.!?], ie, literally speaking, where "there is a previous character that is either '.', '!' or '?'" (you will note that a character is required, ie, no character means no match). This is not bad style per se, what you have to ask yourself is whether that regex suits your needs. The paradox with regexes is that they are very powerful, but rarely fit your needs ;) –  fge Dec 27 '12 at 22:43

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