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I have done a fair amount of research but have not been able to find any answers, to what seems like a simple question:

I want to associate a property with a function (to use as a static variable in this function), like so:

function foo() {
    if (!foo.counter) {
        foo.counter = 1;
    }
    else {
        foo.counter++
    }
    // rest of the function code goes here...
}

If I change the name of the function later, I don't want to have to change references to it inside function definition. So, is there a way to refer to the currently executing function? (other than arguments.callee which is now deprecated). A keyword like thisFunction?

If not, what is the reason for not having something like this?

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Note that static variables don't exist in JavaScript. What you're asking about is the behavior of JavaScript closures. –  seliopou Dec 27 '12 at 19:29
    
Unless your script or function is using strict mode of ES5, you don't have to worry about the "deprecation". As long as the browser's javascript interpreter supports arguments.callee you can use it safely. –  Will C. Dec 27 '12 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I do not know of an identifier or keyword like thisFunction (besides arguments.callee) that JavaScript exposes, but one way to achieve the same effect is to name the function foo in a closure, and return foo from that closure. That way you can always use the name foo within foo to refer to itself, regardless of what variable it's assigned to by your program:

var fn = (function() {
  function foo() {

     if (!foo.counter) {
        foo.counter = 1;
    }
    else {
        foo.counter++
    }
    // rest of the function code goes here...
  }

  return foo;
})();
share|improve this answer
    
I need to do this for more than one function, so I was hoping for something simpler (like a keyword :)) than wrapping each of these functions in another one. Plus there is no guarantee I/someone else wouldn't want to change the name of the inner function in the future... leaving me with essentially the same problem... just one inner function deeper now :D But since this seems to be the best one can do in JavaScript,I'm accepting this as the answer. –  Himanshu P Dec 28 '12 at 9:05
function foo() {
  if (typeof foo.counter=="undefined") {
    foo.counter = 1;
  }
  else {
    foo.counter++
  }
  return foo;
}

var x = new foo();
alert(x.counter);  //1
var y = new foo();
alert(x.counter); //2
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If you don't need to refer to the counter outside of the function, this will work. Instead of setting a variable of the function itself, you define a variable outside of the function and let the function modify that instead. Every time you call makeFoo, it makes a new variable x and returns a function using x. Every time you call the returned function, it still refers to the same x created by makeFoo. Additionally, this entirely encapsulates the variable, ensuring that almost nothing outside of the returned function can change it (it definitely won't be changed by most things outside of the returned function, but there is enough funky javascript reflection that I can't guarantee that nothing will change it). Certainly, moving the function between variables won't affect the counter (ie x=makeFoo();y=x;x=null;).

function makeFoo() {
  var x=0;
  return function () {
    x++;
    return x;
  }
}

//different counters
x=makeFoo();
y=makeFoo();
x();//returns 1
y();//returns 1
x();//returns 2
y();//returns 2

//same counter
x=makeFoo();
y=x;
x();//returns 1
y();//returns 2
x();//returns 3
y();//returns 4
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