Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am relatively new to Backbone.js, but I thought I had the hang of it until now. I have a basic contact-management app going, but whenever I click the submit button for creating a new contact, it sometimes doesn't send a POST request at all, but sometimes Backbone.js sends two or more POST requests when I only intended to send one. A similar situation happens when I try to delete contacts by sending a DELETE request. Here is my stack:

Front-End:
JQuery
Underscore
Backbone
Require

Back-End:
Node
Express
Mongodb and Mongoose

I believe it is a Backbone/Front-End problem because when reading the requests sent with the Chrome Developer Tools network menu, I saw the multiple requests there. Below is what I believe is the relevant code in my app. If you want to see more, just request. I am quite perplexed by this problem, and can only hope that someone out there isn't. Thanks!

editContact.js: (View)

define([
  'jquery',
  'underscore',
  'backbone',
  'text!templates/editcontact.html',
  'models/contact'
], function($, _, Backbone, editContactTemplate, Contact){

  $.fn.serializeObject = function () {
    var o = {};
    var a = this.serializeArray();
    $.each(a, function () {
      if (o[this.name] !== undefined) {
        if (!o[this.name].push) {
          o[this.name] = [o[this.name]];
        }
        o[this.name].push(this.value || '');
      } else {
        o[this.name] = this.value || '';
      }
    });
    return o;
  };

  var EditContactView = Backbone.View.extend({
    el: '.contactview',
    render: function (options) {
      var that = this;
      if (options.id) {
        that.contact = new Contact({id: options.id});
        that.contact.fetch({
          success: function (contact) {
            var template = _.template(editContactTemplate, {contact: contact});
            that.$el.html(template);
          }
        });
      } else {
        var template = _.template(editContactTemplate, {contact: null});
        this.$el.html(template);
      }
    },
    events: {
      'submit .edit-contact-form': 'saveContact',
      'click .delete': 'deleteContact'
    },
    saveContact: function (ev) {
      var contactDetails = $(ev.currentTarget).serializeObject();
      var contact = new Contact();
      contact.save(contactDetails, {
        success: function (contact) {
          Backbone.history.navigate('contacts/' + contact.id, {trigger: true});
        }
      });
      return false;
    },
    deleteContact: function (ev) {
      this.contact.destroy({
        success: function () {
          $('.contactview').html('');
          Backbone.history.navigate('', {trigger: true});
        }
      });
      return false;
      }
  });

  return EditContactView;

});

editContactTemplate.html: (Template)

<form class="edit-contact-form">
  <legend><%= contact ? 'Edit' : 'Create' %> Contact</legend>
  <label>First Name</label>
  <input type="text" name="firstname" value="<%= contact ? contact.get('firstname') : '' %>">
  <label>Last Name</label>
  <input type="text" name="lastname" value="<%= contact ? contact.get('lastname') : '' %>">
  <label>Email</label>
  <input type="text" name="email" value="<%= contact ? contact.get('email') : '' %>">
  <label>Phone Number</label>
  <input type="text" name="phonenumber" value="<%= contact ? contact.get('phonenumber') : '' %>">
  <hr>
  <button type="submit" class="btn"><%= contact ? 'Save' : 'Create' %></button>
  <% if (contact) { %>
    <input type="hidden" name="id" value="<%= contact.id %>">
    <button type="button" class="btn btn-danger delete">Delete</button>
  <% }; %>
</form>

Contact.js: (Model)

define([
  'jquery',
  'underscore',
  'backbone'
], function($, _, Backbone){

  var ContactModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    urlRoot: '/contacts'
  });

  return ContactModel;
});

Router.js (Router)

define([
  'jquery',
  'underscore',
  'backbone',
  'views/allcontacts',
  'views/editcontact',
  'views/contact'
], function($, _, Backbone, AllContactsView, EditContactView, ContactView){
  var AppRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes: {
    '': 'contacts',
    'newcontact': 'editContact',
    'edit/:id': 'editContact',
    'contacts/:id': 'viewContact'
    }
  });

  var initialize = function () {
    var router = new AppRouter();

    router.on('route:contacts', function() {
      var allContactsView = new AllContactsView();
      allContactsView.render();
    });
    router.on('route:editContact', function(id) {
      var allContactsView = new AllContactsView();
      allContactsView.render();
      var editContactView = new EditContactView();
      editContactView.render({id: id});
    });
    router.on('route:viewContact', function(id) {
      var allContactsView = new AllContactsView();
      allContactsView.render();
      var contactView = new ContactView();
      contactView.render({id: id});
    });

    Backbone.history.start();
  };

  return {
    initialize: initialize
  };
});
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Where are you instantiating EditContactView? Is it possible that you're instantiating multiple views with the same "el" (as that would explain the multiples)? As for the missing requests, is it possible that you're instantiating EditContactView without a model sometimes?

Without more info it's hard to guess exactly what might be wrong, but here's a simple debugging idea: define a "fetch" method on your model, add a debugger; line to it, then invoke the Backbone fetch (Backbone.Model.prototype.fetch.apply(this, arguments);). This way you can use Firebug/Chrome dev tools/etc. to pause and inspect things every time your model fetches.

share|improve this answer
    
Here: I'll post the router code as well while I try out your debugging suggestion. Can you explain in a bit more detail what you mean? I understand adding the debugger; line to the model inside a fetch method, but where should I put the Backbone.Model.fetch.apply(this, arguments);, and what exactly does it do? –  Brad Ross Dec 27 '12 at 19:34
    
You'd put it right after the debugger line, and what it does is essentially super() in other languages; in other words, it calls the parent's (in this case, Model's) fetch method, but with "this" (your sub-class of Model) as the "this". By combining the two lines you keep all the fetch functionality that you'd normally inherit from Backbone.Model, but you still get to interject your debugger line. –  machineghost Dec 27 '12 at 19:47
    
(As a side note, this is actually a very useful pattern to learn with Backbone, as it lets your subclasses invoke their parent class's methods when they override them. For instance, maybe your class A extends from class B, and class B has an initialize function. You want A to have it's own initialize, but you also want to keep B's initialize; just do: B.initialize.apply(this, arguments); inside A's initialize, and you're set.) –  machineghost Dec 27 '12 at 19:50
    
Alright: Here is the code I used: var ContactModel = Backbone.Model.extend({ urlRoot: '/contacts' fetch: function () { debugger; Backbone.Model.fetch.apply(this); } }); But it gave me an Uncaught SyntaxError: unexpected identifier error... Sorry if I am a total noob at this. –  Brad Ross Dec 27 '12 at 20:19
    
Oh shoot, I'm really sorry, I messed up the pattern and forgot .prototype. It should have been . Backbone.Model.prototype.fetch.apply(this) ... sorry for the confusion (and man I wish JS made that simpler). –  machineghost Dec 27 '12 at 20:35
show 10 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.