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Which is the correct syntax?

$current_renewal_date = $wpdb->get_results(
                    "
                    SELECT expiry_date
                    FROM bid_tag
                    WHERE id = $renewal_tag_id
                    LIMIT 1
                    "
                );

OR

$current_renewal_date = $wpdb->get_results(
                    "
                    SELECT expiry_date
                    FROM bid_tag
                    WHERE id = {$renewal_tag_id}
                    LIMIT 1
                    "
                );
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The first one. The second one might even work actually. –  user984444 Dec 27 '12 at 19:22
1  
The second one is easier to read and handier when you need to refer to, say, $renewal_tag_id['some_index']. However, in this context, you should consider $wpdb->get_var( $wpdb->prepare("SELECT .. WHERE id = %s LIMIT 1", $renewal_tag_id)) to avoid SQL injection. –  DCoder Dec 27 '12 at 19:25
    
SQL injection with a SELECT statement? –  dcolumbus Dec 27 '12 at 19:35
    
@dcolumbus SQL injection does not mean ‘inject data into the database’ but ‘inject commands into the SQL statement’. –  Gumbo Dec 27 '12 at 20:07
    
@Gumbo, I understand ... thanks. –  dcolumbus Dec 27 '12 at 23:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both are correct. The latter is just used to avoid ambiguity like if you want to reference $foo and not $foobar:

"{$foo}bar"
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They're both correct* and equivalent. When you’re just interpolating a variable and not accessing an element in an array, the braces are optional.

* Use parametrized queries please

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They both work. The preferred way would be using prepared statements and bound parameters.

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I don't know if you could really say that there is a single correct form to put a variable within a string, but the most flexible and sure to work would be:

$current_renewal_date = $wpdb->get_results(
                    "
                    SELECT expiry_date
                    FROM bid_tag
                    WHERE id = ".$renewal_tag_id."
                    LIMIT 1
                    "
                );

There are at least 2 benefits of using this syntax instead of just putting the variable within the string.

Variable misinterpretation

1) When you put the variable within the string, you will probably experience problems if you need to mix the variable with other text.

Example:

$string = "My ID is AB$variableCD";

what is the variable? is it $variable? is it $variableC? or $variableCD? There are many interpretations for this on the syntax that you are using. This doesn't happen when you do

$string = "My ID is AB".$variable."CD";

Array usage

2) You can't easily use variables that have array indexes when you mix them within a string

Example:

$string = "The largest country is $options[countries in the world][$index]";

will get you *PHP Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_ENCAPSED_AND_WHITESPACE, expecting ']'*

while using the following will work perfectly:

$string = "The largest country is ".$options['countries in the world'][$index];

And a little extra that isn't really a matter of syntax...

3) And there is actually a performance benefit, and that is the possibility of using ' instead of " for your strings. Using ' makes the string literal, that is, it isn't parsed and this causes a performance improvement when handling large strings.

$string = 'hello';

instead of

$string = "hello";
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2  
why would that be any more correct than the ones in the question? –  eis Dec 27 '12 at 19:24
    
What do you mean, the most "sure to work"? They all work. String interpolation isn’t some kind of random process. –  minitech Dec 27 '12 at 19:25
    
Sorry, forgot to explain: This is because you avoid 2 big problems: 1) you avoid cases of character escape. 2) you avoid problems with name concatenation. I will modify my answer to add some examples and you will see what I mean. –  Mickle Foretic Dec 28 '12 at 3:23
    
Edited my answer, that should answer your questions. Please comment. –  Mickle Foretic Dec 28 '12 at 3:40

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