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We returned a list of cardID's after a query and those cardID's belong to two tables Student and Personnel. So how can I join those cardID's with Student and Personnel so I can return a table that shows name of Student and Personnel according to cardID's?

Personnel table:

PERSONNELID NUMBER(9,0) 
PERSONNELNAME   VARCHAR2(20)    
PERSONNELSURNAME    VARCHAR2(20)    
PERSONNELJOB    VARCHAR2(40)    
PERSONNELCARDID NUMBER(4,0) 

Student table:

STUDENTID   NUMBER(9,0) 
STUDENTNAME VARCHAR2(20)    
STUDENTSURNAME  VARCHAR2(20)    
STUDENTDEPT VARCHAR2(40)    
STUDENTFACULTY  VARCHAR2(20)    
STUDENTCARDID   NUMBER(4,0) 

CardID table

   CARDID   NUMBER(4,0) 
   USERTYPE VARCHAR2(20)    
   CHARGE   NUMBER(3,2) 
   CREDIT   NUMBER(4,2) 

PaymentDevice table:

    ORDERNO NUMBER  
    PAYDEVIP    NUMBER(8,0) 
    PAYDEVDATE  DATE    No  
    PAYDEVTIME  VARCHAR2(8) 
    CHARGEDCARDID   NUMBER(9,0) 
    MEALTYPE       VARCHAR2(10)

I tried to return first 10 person's name and surname that eat at cafeteria on 27/12/2012

SELECT C.CARDID
FROM CARD C, PAYMENTDEVICE P
WHERE P.ORDERNO
BETWEEN (SELECT MIN(ORDERNO)
FROM PAYMENTDEVICE
WHERE PAYDEVDATE='27/12/2012') AND (SELECT MIN(ORDERNO)
FROM PAYMENTDEVICE
WHERE PAYDEVDATE='27/12/2012')+10    AND C.CARDID=P.CHARGEDCARDID;

Our orderNo isn't reset everyday but keeps increasing so we found the min orderNo that day and add 10 to this value to find first 10 person who eat on that day between those order numbers.

So what return from this query:

  CARDID
  1005
  1000
  1002
  1003
  1009
  2000
  2001
  1007
  2002
  1004
  1006

and those some of those cardId (start with 1) are studentCardId and some of them (starts with 2) are PersonnelCardId. So how can I match and write names accordingly?

share|improve this question
    
... You probably ought to have a single Individual table, with id, name, surname, and cardId in it. Then modify your existing tables into Personnel with individualId, job and Student with individualId, dept, faculty. Much cleaner. I mean, what happens if a student also is 'personnel' - do they get a second card? Would you be expecting them to show up twice in your listing? Which would be the 'preferred' duplicate? –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 27 '12 at 19:47
    
can't we find names from different tables according to their cardIds? –  Figen Güngör Dec 27 '12 at 19:52
    
Perhaps you could include sample starting data, and your desired results? –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 27 '12 at 20:00
    
I edited my question. Can you look at it now, please? –  Figen Güngör Dec 27 '12 at 20:10
1  
Yeah, the information you've added helps. There's still issues with your schema design though - I'd still be wanting an Individual table. Other notes - your date/time columns in PaymentDevice (which isn't what the table actually holds) should be a single timestamp-type column. Even if orderNo is monotonically increasing, I'd prefer working with those columns for 'first' sales. I'm assuming that Card.userType refers to personnel/student, and is the actual text; if so, that's dangerous de-normalization, and should be avoided. The digits used in Card seem way too low, all columns. –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 27 '12 at 20:35
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT *
FROM Personel p INNER JOIN Student s 
ON p.PersonnelCardId = s.StudentCardId 
INNER JOIN ReturnedQuery rq
ON rq.CardId = p.PersonnelCardId

updated:

    SELECT p.PersonnelName, rq.CardId
    FROM Personel p INNER JOIN ReturnedQuery rq
    ON rq.CardId = p.PersonnelCardId 

    UNION

    SELECT s.StudentName, rq.Cardid
    FROM Student s INNER JOIN ReturnedQuery rq 
    ON s.StudentCardId = rq.Cardid 
share|improve this answer
    
why do you compare p.PersonnelCardId = s.StudentCardId? They are different. –  Figen Güngör Dec 27 '12 at 19:50
    
how about the updated one? –  urlreader Dec 27 '12 at 20:12
    
I love you, urlreader. =) –  Figen Güngör Dec 27 '12 at 20:26
    
But cardId order is broken in that case, how to fix this? –  Figen Güngör Dec 27 '12 at 20:38
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Your original query is actually pretty fragile. I'd rewrite it like so (and added the needed joins):

WITH First_Daily_Purchase as (SELECT chargedCardId,
                                     MIN(payDevTime) as payDevTime, 
                                     MIN(orderNo) as orderNo
                              FROM PaymentDevice
                              WHERE payDevDate >= 
                                              TO_DATE('2012-12-27', 'YYYY-MM-DD')
                                    AND payDevDate <
                                              TO_DATE('2012-12-28', 'YYYY-MM-DD')
                              GROUP BY chargedCardId),
     First_10_Daily_Purchasers as (SELECT chargedCardId
                                   FROM (SELECT chargedCardId, 
                                                RANK() OVER(ORDER BY payDevTime,
                                                                 orderNo) as rank
                                         FROM First_Daily_Purchase) a
                                   WHERE a.rank < 11)
SELECT a.chargedCardId, b.personnelName, b.personnelSurname
FROM First_10_Daily_Purchasers a
JOIN Personnel b
ON b.personnelCardId = a.chargedCardId
UNION ALL
SELECT a.chargedCardId, b.studentName, b.studentSurname
FROM First_10_Daily_Purchasers a
JOIN Student b
ON b.studentCardId = a.chargedCardId

(Have a working SQL Fiddle - generally bullet-proofing this took me a while.)
This should get you the first 10 people who made a purchase (not the first 11 purchases, which is what you were actually getting). This of course assumes that payDevTime is actually stored in a sortable format (if it isn't you have bigger problems than this query not working quite right).

That said, there's a number of troubling things about your schema design.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your effort, Clockwork-Muse. =) However, the time format wasn't problematic as varchar datatype. It worked smoothly with queries. For example, we were able to return students who eat between '11:30:00' and '12:00:00' on a particular day. We checked them on data and the result was true. So where may a problem exists about time, can you give an example? –  Figen Güngör Dec 28 '12 at 22:37
1  
payDevTime probably is in a sortable time format (eg, using 09:00:00 instead of 9:00:00). However, you'd be better served by combining the date and time columns, as the 'Date' type in Oracle has the time information in it (which is why I had to do the comparisons I did, as a range). –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 28 '12 at 22:54
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