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I have template functions, say,

template<class T> 
void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec)
{
    size_t b, m, e,
    ...
    mysort(vec, b, m, e);
}

template<class T>
void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec, size_t b, size_t m, size_t e)
{
     size_t x, y, z;
     ...
     mysort (vec, x, y, z);
}

The public interface is the one take only a vector reference. I would like to hide the other one, the implementation, so that no client code can do

mysort(vec, a, b, c);

It doesn't feel right to create a class and make the implementation function private static, I try to use the anonymous namespace,

namespace abc 
{
    namespace 
    {
        template<class T>
        void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec, size_t b, size_t m, size_t e)..
    }

    template<class T> 
    void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec)...

}

It helps, but not exactly a knockout...

#include "mysort.h"

int main()
{
    ...
    abc::mysort(vec, a, b, c); // this won't compile, good
}

however if I change it to:

#include "mysort.h"

using namespace abc;

int main()
{
    ...
    mysort(vec, a, b, c); // it compiles and runs!!
}

I am using gcc Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5 on x86_64. can anyone explain why it compiles with using directive, but not with qualified names, and whether there is a better way to achieve what I want?

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My first thought was that the anonymous namespace was dumping stuff into the global anonymous namespace and the using declaration wasn't even needed, but I was wrong. Here's a SSSCE: codepad.org/kUTBPWxh –  Ben Voigt Dec 27 '12 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The common idiom for this is to create a "detail" namespace, which is intended only for internally-used code:

namespace abc 
{
    namespace detail
    {
        template<class T>
        void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec, size_t b, size_t m, size_t e)..
    }

    template<class T> 
    void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec)...

}

To answer your question about the unnamed namespace behavior:

Unnamed namespaces (they're not called anonymous namespaces) are named a bit weird -- they're unnamed to you, but the compiler actually generates a unique internal name for it. Your example is equivalent to:

namespace abc 
{
    namespace def // lets say 'def' is unique.
    {
        template<class T>
        void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec, size_t b, size_t m, size_t e)..
    }
    using namespace def;

    template<class T> 
    void mysort(std::vector<T>& vec)...

}

You'll notice it behaves the same as your unnamed example: you can't do abc::mysort(vec, 1, 2, 3) here, but you can using namespace abc; mysort(vec, 1, 2, 3).

This happens because there aren't two abc::mysorts, only a abc::def::mysort and abc::mysort. When you declared an actual abc::mysort, it hides the one brought in by using namespace def. Note if you comment out the 1-param mysort, you can actually say abc::mysort(vec, 1, 2, 3).

Because it was hidden, a qualified call to abc::mysort must look at explicitly abc::mysort, and only finds the 1-param version.

However, with an unqualified call via using namespace abc; mysort(vec, 1, 2, 3), it can use ADL to find any available function which matches.

share|improve this answer
    
that doesn't prevent client from doing abc::detail::mysort(....) –  arrows Dec 27 '12 at 19:58
    
@ethan: This way at least documents that it is a bad idea. –  Benjamin Bannier Dec 27 '12 at 19:59
    
Indeed. All you can do is to not externally document the detail namespace, other than to say it is unsupported and may change drastically in future versions. This is a strategy used in pretty much every large template-based library today -- don't overcomplicate things! –  Cory Nelson Dec 27 '12 at 20:04
1  
This is just as good as private... it is compiler-assisted documentation. C++ access modifiers do NOT provide security. If it would help to call the namespace abc_internal_use_only then do that! Of course nothing prevents any client from copying the code from your header file directly into theirs. –  Ben Voigt Dec 27 '12 at 20:06
1  
Updated to explain the unnamed namespace behavior! –  Cory Nelson Dec 27 '12 at 20:40

I did some more testing, actually, in a later version gcc (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) and -std=c++0x, it does exactly what I expected.

In the main file, neither the using directive or using the qualified name will allow you to call a function inside an anonymous namespace that itself is inside another namespace.

I think the reason is the compiler confirms the latest standard, which says an unnamed namespace has internal linkage by default.

It seems to me, the unnamed namespace approach should be preferred to the old "detail" namespace practice.

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