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The height of a node is the length of the path to the farthest leaf node. Kind of like node depth but in the other direction, although I don't think the solution can be quite as simple.


I don't have any practical use for this: the problem I initialiy thought I needed it for turned out not to need it. But since I wrote a solution before realizing that, I figured I'd post it here in case in turns out to be handy in the future.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use:

 if(node())
   then
      max(.//node()[not(node())]/count(ancestor::node()))
     -
      count(ancestor::node())
    else 0

And the transformation to add a "height" attribute to every element:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"   xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

  <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="*">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
      <xsl:attribute name="height" select=
        "if(node())
         then
           max(.//node()[not(node())]/count(ancestor::node()))
         -
           count(ancestor::node())
         else 0
      "/>
      <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied, for example on this XML document:

<producers>
  <producer>
    <id>8</id>
    <name>Emåmejeriet</name>
    <street>Grenvägen 1-3</street>
    <postal>577 39</postal>
    <city>Hultsfred</city>
    <weburl>http://www.emamejerie3t.se</weburl>
    <certified/>
  </producer>
</producers>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<producers height="3">
  <producer height="2">
      <id height="1">8</id>
      <name height="1">Emåmejeriet</name>
      <street height="1">Grenvägen 1-3</street>
      <postal height="1">577 39</postal>
      <city height="1">Hultsfred</city>
      <weburl height="1">http://www.emamejerie3t.se</weburl>
      <certified height="0"/>
  </producer>
</producers>
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What's wrong with

max(.//node()/count(ancestor::*)) - count(ancestor::*)
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If you try it with the XML document from my answer you'll notice a slight anomaly. – Dimitre Novatchev Dec 28 '12 at 4:06

The following stylesheet marks each node with a height attribute.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                xmlns:exsl="http://exslt.org/common"
                xmlns:math="http://exslt.org/math"
                extension-element-prefixes="math exsl"
                version="1.0">
  <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="no"/>

  <xsl:template name="height">
    <xsl:param name="node"/>
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="$node/node()">
        <xsl:variable name="child-heights">
          <xsl:for-each select="$node/node()">
            <height>
              <xsl:call-template name="height">
                <xsl:with-param name="node" select="."/>
              </xsl:call-template>
            </height>
          </xsl:for-each>
        </xsl:variable>

        <xsl:value-of select="math:max(exsl:node-set($child-heights)/height) + 1"/>
      </xsl:when>

      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="0"/>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="*">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:attribute name="height">
        <xsl:call-template name="height">
          <xsl:with-param name="node" select="."/>
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:attribute>
      <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
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