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I have a SQL Server 2000 database with approximately 220 tables. These tables have a number foreign key relationships between them. Through performance analysis, we've discovered a number of these foreign key relationships are missing indexes. Instead of being reactive to performance problems, I'd like to be pro-active and find all foreign keys that are missing indexes.

How can I programmatically determine which foreign key are missing indexes?

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Missing or rarely used? This article is for 2005, but could help: blogs.msdn.com/sqlcat/archive/2006/02/13/531339.aspx – OMG Ponies Sep 10 '09 at 15:57
    
Missing. Rarely used is another interesting performance optimization, but not what I'm interested in here. – John Naegle Sep 10 '09 at 16:01
SELECT  *
FROM    sys.foreign_keys fk
WHERE   EXISTS
        (
        SELECT  *
        FROM    sys.foreign_key_columns fkc
        WHERE   fkc.constraint_object_id = fk.object_id
                AND NOT EXISTS
                (
                SELECT  *
                FROM    sys.index_columns ic
                WHERE   ic.object_id = fkc.parent_object_id
                        AND ic.column_id = fkc.parent_column_id
                        AND ic.index_column_id = fkc.constraint_column_id
                )
        )

I don't have a copy of SQL Server 2000 handy, but you may need to change sys.foreign_key to sysforeignkeys etc., like described here.

This query selects all foreign keys which don't have an index covering all columns that comprise the key.

This supports multi-column foreign keys just as well.

This, however, will return a false positive if there is a composite index that covers all columns but they are not the leftmost columns in this index.

Like, if there is a FOREIGN KEY (col2, col3) and an index on (col1, col2, col3), this will return that there is an index despite the fact this index is unusable for this foreign key.

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This probably does what I want for SQL Server 2005 and later, but I haven't tested it. I'll post the SQL Server 2000 equivalent when I convert it. – John Naegle Sep 10 '09 at 17:30
1  
I would also have AND ic.index_column_id = fkc.constraint_column_id in the NOT EXISTS to ensure the index is in the correct index key column order too. Otherwise, exactly what I use day to day – gbn Apr 25 '13 at 9:05
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is an answer that works for SQL Server 2000 authored by a co-worker:

/*
Description:
    This script outputs a table with all the current database un-indexed foreign keys.

    The table has three columns ( TableName , ColumnName, ForeignKeyName ) 
    TableName: The table containing the un-indexed foreign key
    ColumnName: The foreign key column that’s not indexed 
    ForeignKeyName: Name of foreign key witch column doesn’t have an index 
    */
DECLARE 
    @TableName varchar(255),
    @ColumnName varchar(255),
    @ForeignKeyName sysname

SET NOCOUNT ON
SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED

DECLARE FKColumns_cursor CURSOR Fast_Forward FOR
SELECT  cu.TABLE_NAME, cu.COLUMN_NAME, cu.CONSTRAINT_NAME
FROM    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS ic 
    INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE cu ON ic.CONSTRAINT_NAME = cu.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE   ic.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY'

CREATE TABLE #temp1(    
    TableName varchar(255),
    ColumnName varchar(255),
    ForeignKeyName sysname
)

OPEN FKColumns_cursor  
FETCH NEXT FROM FKColumns_cursor INTO @TableName, @ColumnName, @ForeignKeyName

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0  
BEGIN

    IF ( SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM	sysobjects o 	
    	INNER JOIN sysindexes x ON x.id = o.id
    	INNER JOIN  syscolumns c ON o.id = c.id 
    	INNER JOIN sysindexkeys xk ON c.colid = xk.colid AND o.id = xk.id AND x.indid = xk.indid
    WHERE	o.type in ('U')
    	AND xk.keyno <= x.keycnt
    	AND permissions(o.id, c.name) <> 0
    	AND (x.status&32) = 0
    	AND o.name = @TableName
    	AND c.name = @ColumnName
    ) = 0
    BEGIN
    	INSERT INTO #temp1 SELECT @TableName, @ColumnName, @ForeignKeyName
    END


    FETCH NEXT FROM FKColumns_cursor INTO @TableName, @ColumnName, @ForeignKeyName
END  
CLOSE FKColumns_cursor  
DEALLOCATE FKColumns_cursor 

SELECT * FROM #temp1 ORDER BY TableName
share|improve this answer

Built on the above code to drop the temp table and get scripts to create the indexes.

   /*
Description:

    */
DECLARE 
    @SchemaName varchar(255),
    @TableName varchar(255),
    @ColumnName varchar(255),
    @ForeignKeyName sysname

SET NOCOUNT ON
SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED

DECLARE FKColumns_cursor CURSOR Fast_Forward FOR
SELECT  cu.TABLE_SCHEMA, cu.TABLE_NAME, cu.COLUMN_NAME, cu.CONSTRAINT_NAME
FROM    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS ic 
    INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE cu ON ic.CONSTRAINT_NAME = cu.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE   ic.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY'

CREATE TABLE #temp1(    
    SchemaName varchar(255),
    TableName varchar(255),
    ColumnName varchar(255),
    ForeignKeyName sysname
)

OPEN FKColumns_cursor  
FETCH NEXT FROM FKColumns_cursor INTO @SchemaName,@TableName, @ColumnName, @ForeignKeyName

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0  
BEGIN

    IF ( SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM        sysobjects o    
        INNER JOIN sysindexes x ON x.id = o.id
        INNER JOIN  syscolumns c ON o.id = c.id 
        INNER JOIN sysindexkeys xk ON c.colid = xk.colid AND o.id = xk.id AND x.indid = xk.indid
    WHERE       o.type in ('U')
        AND xk.keyno <= x.keycnt
        AND permissions(o.id, c.name) <> 0
        AND (x.status&32) = 0
        AND o.name = @TableName
        AND c.name = @ColumnName
    ) = 0
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO #temp1 SELECT @SchemaName, @TableName, @ColumnName, @ForeignKeyName
    END


    FETCH NEXT FROM FKColumns_cursor INTO @SchemaName,@TableName, @ColumnName, @ForeignKeyName
END  
CLOSE FKColumns_cursor  
DEALLOCATE FKColumns_cursor 

SELECT 'CREATE INDEX IDX_' + ForeignKeyName + ' ON ' + SchemaName + '.' + TableName + '(' + ColumnName +')'
FROM #temp1 
ORDER BY TableName

drop table #temp1 
share|improve this answer

In my post "SQL Script to create indexes for Foreign keys" I've put links to 2 implementations: paul_nielsen’s and tklimczak's (login to sqlservercentral is required)

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Firstly: list the columns with a foreign key constraint. This will help:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/831589/query-to-get-all-foreign-key-constraints-in-sqlserver-2000

Cross-compare with sysindexes and syscolumns tables; the keys field in sysindexes has a list of all keys in the index.

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