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A && B || C && D

(A && B) || (C && D)

Are both boolean logic equal in C++? I am confused can someone help pelase

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Please search first. The keywords here are immediately c++ and boolean operator. Another useful word is precedence. There should be no shortage of useful information online. (Random first hit: cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/operators) –  user166390 Dec 27 '12 at 21:10
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3 Answers

Whether or not they're equal depends entirely on how you define your operator precedence. If && takes precedence over ||, then yes. Otherwise, no.

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how about in C++? –  retide Dec 27 '12 at 21:06
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@retide Search for c++ operator precedence. Question diverted! –  user166390 Dec 27 '12 at 21:07
    
@pst has the right answer, but I'm sure there will be other answers here shortly that fill in the C++-specific information for you. –  Carl Norum Dec 27 '12 at 21:11
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In the most programming languages you'll find that operator && is of higher priority than ||. So for example in Java, C#, C, C++, Python, Ruby, etc.

A && B || C && D 

is equivalent to

(A && B) || (C && D)

You can even copy-paste the code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
        bool A = false;
        bool B = false;
        bool C = true;
        bool D = true;
        for(int i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
            A = (i == 0);
            for(int j = 0; j < 2; ++j) {
               B = (j == 0);
                for(int k = 0; k < 2; ++k) {
                   C = (k == 0);
                    for(int l = 0; l < 2; ++l) {
                       D = (l == 0);
                       cout << A << " " << B << " " << C << " " << D << " -> ";
                       cout << ((A && B || C && D) == ((A && B) || (C && D)))  << endl;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return 0;
}

to Ideone to find out for yourself. In C++ for example the output is:

1 1 1 1 -> 1
1 1 1 0 -> 1
1 1 0 1 -> 1
1 1 0 0 -> 1
1 0 1 1 -> 1
1 0 1 0 -> 1
1 0 0 1 -> 1
1 0 0 0 -> 1
0 1 1 1 -> 1
0 1 1 0 -> 1
0 1 0 1 -> 1
0 1 0 0 -> 1
0 0 1 1 -> 1
0 0 1 0 -> 1
0 0 0 1 -> 1
0 0 0 0 -> 1

So the ((A && B || C && D) == ((A && B) || (C && D))) is a tautology.

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While the final answer goes to the specifics of the C++ language you're asking about, here's some food for thought on why (and possibly how) to remember:

Conjunction (AND, &&) is often associated with multiplication, while disjunction (OR, ||) is often associated with addition (and we generally know the precedence of multiplication over addition).

Here's a quote from http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~fricke/projects/quinto/dnf.html:

... As a practical matter, we usually associate conjunction with multiplication and disjunction with addition. Indeed, if we identify true with 1 and false with 0, then {0,1} coupled with the usual definitions of addition and multiplication over the Galois field of size 2 (eg, arithmetic modulo 2), then addition (+) and disjunction (or) really are the same, as are multiplication and conjunction (and). ...

Speaking in rather general terms, the computer languages tend to honor the precedence of multiplicative operators over additive operators.

(Further, these associations, e.g. between operators in logic and in algebra reoccur in other areas, such as type systems. For an interesting exposition of that, see http://blog.lab49.com/archives/3011 on the notion of Algebraic Type Systems.)

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