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def display_positive_indices(strlen):
    print()
    print(' ', end='')
    for i in range(strlen + 1):
        print(i, end='')
        if i != strlen:
            print(' ' * (4 - len(str(i))), end='')
    print()

Hi, I'm new to programming. This is my code. The error first points to the main function. Then it points to this function in the main then it points to: for i in range(strlen + 1) and it says Type Error: Can't convert 'int' object to str implicitly. Why does it say this? What can I do to fix this error?

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1  
What is strlen when you call it? (Also, I assume this is Python 3, not 2, because of the print functions, but it's best to say so explicitly.) Also, please show the actual error output, rather than trying to describe it. –  abarnert Dec 27 '12 at 21:12
    
thats what the error says. word for word is Traceback (most recent call last): File "/Users/kavitavijayan/Workspace/Chp6Prob5/stringslicer.py", line 91, in <module> main() File "/Users/kavitavijayan/Workspace/Chp6Prob5/stringslicer.py", line 73, in main display_positive_indices(string) File "/Users/kavitavijayan/Workspace/Chp6Prob5/stringslicer.py", line 33, in display_positive_indices for i in range(strlen + 1): TypeError: Can't convert 'int' object to str implicitly –  Kavita Vijayan Dec 27 '12 at 21:15
    
yes its python 3.2 –  Kavita Vijayan Dec 27 '12 at 21:16
2  
So since you know the error is in that line, why not try making a minimal test case, breaking it down until the problem goes away. You'll see that range(strlen + 1) has the same exception, so next try strlen + 1, which again has the same exception, so next try strlen, which doesn't… now you know what to ask about ("Why does strlen + 1 raise this exception?") without making us wade through other code. –  abarnert Dec 27 '12 at 21:19
    
oh ok thanks! :) –  Kavita Vijayan Dec 27 '12 at 21:21

2 Answers 2

Your function works fine if you call it with an integer, such as:

In [499]: display_positive_indices(3)

 0   1   2   3

But when you call it with a string, you get this error, and the interpreter tells you more information:

In [500]: display_positive_indices('3')

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-500-dd39f751056c> in <module>()
----> 1 display_positive_indices('3')

<ipython-input-495-ac7e32dd0c50> in display_positive_indices(strlen)
      2     print()
      3     print(' ', end='')
----> 4     for i in range(strlen + 1):
      5         print(i, end='')
      6         if i != strlen:

TypeError: Can't convert 'int' object to str implicitly

The problem is that strlen + 1. You're trying to add a str to an int. You get the exact same error with just this:

In [501]: strlen = '3'

In [502]: strlen + 1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-502-5a3ed0dba868> in <module>()
----> 1 strlen + 1

TypeError: Can't convert 'int' object to str implicitly

In Python 3, trying to add something to a str starts off by trying to implicitly convert that other thing to a str, and, as the error says, you can't do that with an int.

Meanwhile, for future reference, here's how to debug an error like this:

To start off with, you know which line in your function has the error. So, keep removing stuff until the error goes away. First:

def display_positive_indices(strlen):
    for i in range(strlen + 1):
        pass

Same error. So:

def display_positive_indices(strlen):
    range(strlen + 1)

And again:

def display_positive_indices(strlen):
    strlen + 1

And:

def display_positive_indices(strlen):
    strlen

OK, that last one succeeded, so the problem was in strlen + 1. Everything else is irrelevant. So, you've narrowed down what you have to figure out, ask about, and/or understand.

Finally, if you want us to figure out what's wrong with the main function, and why it's passing a str rather than the int you expected, you'll have to show us that function. (Of the top of my head, my first guess is that you're using input to get a length from the user, and not converting it, possibly because you read the Python 2 docs on input instead of the Python 3 docs. But I'd give that guess a 20% chance of being right at best.)

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Thanks for responding! But strlen is an integer it is the length of a string –  Kavita Vijayan Dec 27 '12 at 21:14
2  
@KavitaVijayan: that seems unlikely. After the first print(), add print(type(strlen), repr(strlen)). –  DSM Dec 27 '12 at 21:15
1  
@pst: No, you were right for Py3, but not for Py2. Py3's str.__add__ method tries an implicit (C-API) conversion to str before raising, and that conversion raises exactly this error. –  abarnert Dec 27 '12 at 21:17
    
so after the print() i should add the print(type(strlen), repr(strlen)) ?? –  Kavita Vijayan Dec 27 '12 at 21:19
2  
@pst: You shouldn't have deleted your comment; I tried to upvote it and got an error. (Apparently SO can't add None+1 any better than Python can.:)) –  abarnert Dec 27 '12 at 21:20

Since you require an integer you can coerce it to the type you would like, and if it cannot be converted you will get a TypeError or ValueError:

...
strlen = int(strlen)
for i in range(strlen + 1):
    ...
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