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I've heard that the term firmware comes from it being between hardware and software. I have also heard that it refers to software that comes from the firm (company) that builds the hardware.

When was the term first used and what is the origin of the term?

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6  
I've never heard it being used in the second manner you described. –  Spencer Ruport Sep 10 '09 at 16:00
    
This should have been wiki when I asked it; my bad. –  sal Sep 10 '09 at 17:15
    
@Spencer, I am hoping that someone can find reference for that origin. –  sal Sep 10 '09 at 19:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

From Wikipedia:

The term "firmware" was coined by Ascher Opler in a 1967 Datamation article. Originally, it meant the microcode – contents of a writable control store (a specialized small area of RAM memory), which defined and implemented the computer's instruction set....Firmware has evolved to mean almost any programmable content of a hardware device, not only machine code for a processor, but also configurations and data for application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), programmable logic devices, etc.

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It's somewhere between hard(ware) and soft(ware) - so it's firm! –  Matt Ball Sep 10 '09 at 16:04
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A case of 'LMWTFY' then (a variation on "LMGTFY"!) –  Skizz Sep 10 '09 at 16:05

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firmware#Origin_of_the_term

Firmware

Origin of the term

The term "firmware" was coined by Ascher Opler in a 1967 Datamation article.[1] Originally, it meant the microcode – contents of a writable control store (a specialized small area of RAM memory), which defined and implemented the computer's instruction set. The firmware could be reloaded if needed to specialize or modify the instructions that the central processing unit (CPU) could execute. As originally used, firmware was contrasted with hardware (the CPU itself) and software (normal instructions executing on a CPU). It was not composed of CPU machine instructions, but of lower-level microcode involved in the implementation of machine instructions. It existed on the boundary of hardware and software, thus the term firmware.

Later the term was broadened to include any type of microcode, whether in RAM or ROM.

Still later, the term was again broadened in popular usage to denote anything ROM-resident, including processor machine instructions for BIOS, bootstrap loaders, or specialized applications.

When it comes to the subject of updating the firmware to a new version, a typical procedure until the mid 1990s, was to replace a storage medium containing firmware, usually a socketed ROM. Nowadays, this approach is largely abandoned in presence of firmware's capability to overwrite itself in a convenient, purely electronic operation.

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A simple query to wikipedia will answer this, really..

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-1 for posting link without text –  Graeme Perrow Sep 10 '09 at 15:59
    
+1 @Graeme Really, should we copy all the links? –  Grzegorz Oledzki Sep 10 '09 at 16:05
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@Grzegorz: Definitely yes, at least the relevant parts. Otherwise you force the reader over to another web site, where the page may have vanished or the information changed. If someone else has the same question two years from now and finds this page through google, having the answer here is much more useful than a link to where the answer used to be. –  Graeme Perrow Sep 10 '09 at 16:40
    
@Graeme: -1 for showing a user to do the very basic "search the web" he should have done bofore? wow... This question is so really irrelevant, I tried not to be rude when answering. This is a simple basic historical question Google answers in seconds. but then it's your opinion. –  Jay Sep 10 '09 at 18:40

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