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I am having a hard time understanding why this always returns an empty variable

    Private Function checkEnvelopeStatus(aEnvelopeID As String) As String
    Dim lEnvelopeStatusMessage As String

    Try
        Dim lEnvelopeStatus = mDsapi.RequestStatusEx(aEnvelopeID)
        lEnvelopeStatusMessage = "Subject:" & lEnvelopeStatus.Subject & vbCrLf & "Status Code: " & lEnvelopeStatus.Status
    Catch ex As Exception
        MessageBox.Show(ex.StackTrace, ex.Message)
    End Try

    Return lEnvelopeStatusMessage
End Function

Yet this will return the message I want

    Private Function checkEnvelopeStatus(aEnvelopeID As String) As String
    Dim lEnvelopeStatusMessage As String

    Try
        Dim lEnvelopeStatus = mDsapi.RequestStatusEx(aEnvelopeID)
        aEnvelopeID = "Subject:" & lEnvelopeStatus.Subject & vbCrLf & "Status Code: " & lEnvelopeStatus.Status
    Catch ex As Exception
        MessageBox.Show(ex.StackTrace, ex.Message)
    End Try

    Return aEnvelopeID 
End Function

It seems that the value of the string when it is a variable local to the function is being cleared out after my TRy catch closes. Yet when I replace it with the parameter coming in I am able to preserve the string external to the Try Catch? I am mainly a C#/C++ developer so this is confusing behavior for me. Can anyone explain why this might happen?

Here is a much more sanitized version of the code above

Public Function foo(a As String) As String
    Dim b As String
    Try
        b = "banana:"
    Catch ex As Exception

    End Try

    Return b
End Function

It exhibits the same behavior.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C#, you cannot compile a method's code where a path exist, in the execution flow, that could lead to the exit from the method without initializing the return value. You get a compiler error for using a variable not assigned.

In VB.NET you would have avoided the error if you had changed the option "Use of variable before assignement" from Warning to Error in the Build page of your project options. (And I strongly recommend to do so)

(Not sure for the exact name of the option because I use a localized version of Visual Studio)

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That code should not compile,I tried this, and it gave me a compiler error "Error 3 Use of unassigned local variable 'b'"

Something wrong with your compiler, what are you using?

    static public string foo(string a)
    {
        String b;
        try
        {
            b = "banana";
        }
        catch
        {

        }

        return b;
    }
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It wouldn't compile till you rethrow the excaption. Consider following:

public String foo(String a) {
    String b;

    try {
        b="banana:";
    }
    catch {
        throw;
    }

    return b;
}

This code would compile, because if there was an exception, it rethrows. The compiler predicts the logical problems like unreachable code(though unreachable code was not an error). Equivalence in VB.net:

Public Function foo(a As String) As String
    Dim b As String

    Try
        b = "banana:"
    Catch ex As Exception
        Throw ex
    End Try

    Return b
End Function

By the way, catch any exception was considered a bad practice of coding.

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I wrote the same code in C#

public string foo(string a)
{
    String b;
    try
    {
        b = "banana";
    }
    catch
    {

    }

    return b;
}

}

It does seem to exhibit the same behavior. I was taken back. Thinking about it more, it makes sense. I am just declaring the variable not actually defining it to anything yet. So replacing the above examples with something like this:

        public string foo(string a)
    {
        String b = "";
        try
        {
            b = "banana";
        }
        catch
        {

        }

        return b;
    }
}

Fixed all my problems. Hope this can help someone in the future. The more you know....

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