Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Disclaimer: I have figured out the problem (I think), but I wanted to add this issue to Stack Overflow since I couldn't (easily) find it anywhere. Also, someone might have a better answer than I do.

I have a database where one table "Common" is referenced by several other tables. I wanted to see what records in the Common table were orphaned (i.e., had no references from any of the other tables).

I ran this query:

select *
from Common
where common_id not in (select common_id from Table1)
and common_id not in (select common_id from Table2)

I know that there are orphaned records, but no records were returned. Why not?

(This is SQL Server, if it matters.)

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Update:

These articles in my blog describe the differences between the methods in more detail:


There are three ways to do such a query:

  • LEFT JOIN / IS NULL:

    SELECT  *
    FROM    common
    LEFT JOIN
            table1 t1
    ON      t1.common_id = common.common_id
    WHERE   t1.common_id IS NULL
    
  • NOT EXISTS:

    SELECT  *
    FROM    common
    WHERE   NOT EXISTS
            (
            SELECT  NULL
            FROM    table1 t1
            WHERE   t1.common_id = common.common_id
            )
    
  • NOT IN:

    SELECT  *
    FROM    common
    WHERE   common_id NOT IN
            (
            SELECT  common_id
            FROM    table1 t1
            )
    

When table1.common_id is not nullable, all these queries are semantically the same.

When it is nullable, NOT IN is different, since IN (and, therefore, NOT IN) return NULL when a value does not match anything in a list containing a NULL.

This may be confusing but may become more obvious if we recall the alternate syntax for this:

common_id = ANY
(
SELECT  common_id
FROM    table1 t1
)

The result of this condition is a boolean product of all comparisons within the list. Of course, a single NULL value yields the NULL result which renders the whole result NULL too.

We never cannot say definitely that common_id is not equal to anything from this list, since at least one of the values is NULL.

Suppose we have these data:

common

--
1
3

table1

--
NULL
1
2

LEFT JOIN / IS NULL and NOT EXISTS will return 3, NOT IN will return nothing (since it will always evaluate to either FALSE or NULL).

In MySQL, in case on non-nullable column, LEFT JOIN / IS NULL and NOT IN are a little bit (several percent) more efficient than NOT EXISTS. If the column is nullable, NOT EXISTS is the most efficient (again, not much).

In Oracle, all three queries yield same plans (an ANTI JOIN).

In SQL Server, NOT IN / NOT EXISTS are more efficient, since LEFT JOIN / IS NULL cannot be optimized to an ANTI JOIN by its optimizer.

In PostgreSQL, LEFT JOIN / IS NULL and NOT EXISTS are more efficient than NOT IN, sine they are optimized to an Anti Join, while NOT IN uses hashed subplan (or even a plain subplan if the subquery is too large to hash)

share|improve this answer
1  
Great answer! Thanks! –  StevenMcD Sep 28 '09 at 7:14
    
Great explanation! –  lud0h Oct 9 '09 at 11:51
    
this is awesome and very helpful –  kavun Apr 26 '12 at 18:01
    
Thank you Quassnoi. –  Mehboob Sep 18 '13 at 4:05
1  
+1 because, four and a half years on, this answer helped me out with a problem that had me stumped! –  Carson63000 Mar 26 at 4:58

If you want the world to be a two-valued boolean place, you must prevent the null (third value) case yourself.

Don't write IN clauses that allow nulls in the list side. Filter them out!

common_id not in
(
  select common_id from Table1
  where common_id is not null
)
share|improve this answer
    
You misunderstood the question - re-read. –  OMG Ponies Sep 10 '09 at 17:52
1  
nulls in the in-clause-list are a common reason for missing query results. –  David B Sep 11 '09 at 13:01
    
Actually, I think David B understood the question better than anyone else. I wanted to know WHY no results were returned. Upvoted. –  Jeremy Stein Sep 11 '09 at 14:22

Table1 or Table2 has some null values for common_id. Use this query instead:

select *
from Common
where common_id not in (select common_id from Table1 where common_id is not null)
and common_id not in (select common_id from Table2 where common_id is not null)
share|improve this answer
    
What if there's data in one table but not the other? Do you want "and" or "or" there? –  Philip Kelley Sep 10 '09 at 16:30
    
I'm looking for records not referenced in any table, so I want AND. I'll clarify the question. –  Jeremy Stein Sep 10 '09 at 16:35

Just off the top of my head...

select c.commonID, t1.commonID, t2.commonID
from Common c
     left outer join Table1 t1 on t1.commonID = c.commonID
     left outer join Table2 t2 on t2.commonID = c.commonID
where t1.commonID is null 
     and t2.commonID is null

I ran a few tests and here were my results w.r.t. @patmortech's answer and @rexem's comments.

If either Table1 or Table2 is not indexed on commonID, you get a table scan but @patmortech's query is still twice as fast (for a 100K row master table).

If neither are indexed on commonID, you get two table scans and the difference is negligible.

If both are indexed on commonID, the "not exists" query runs in 1/3 the time.

share|improve this answer
    
That should be an AND in the where clause. Otherwise, that works. –  Jeremy Stein Sep 10 '09 at 16:33
    
changed per your comment. The "or" picks out orphans in either table. –  Austin Salonen Sep 10 '09 at 16:35
    
That's better. By the way, is there some reason I should use outer joins rather than the subquery? –  Jeremy Stein Sep 10 '09 at 16:37
2  
Readability is primary one. I suspect a better execution plan would be generated but without a query plan, I can't confirm. –  Austin Salonen Sep 10 '09 at 16:57
1  
This approach is worse that using NOT EXISTS - the join results in fetching more rows than it needs, then the results compared for the columns being null. And NOT EXISTS is more readable to boot. –  OMG Ponies Sep 10 '09 at 17:29
SELECT T.common_id
  FROM Common T
       LEFT JOIN Table1 T1 ON T.common_id = T1.common_id
       LEFT JOIN Table2 T2 ON T.common_id = T2.common_id
 WHERE T1.common_id IS NULL
   AND T2.common_id IS NULL
share|improve this answer
1  
This approach is worse that using NOT EXISTS - the join results in fetching more rows than it needs, then the results compared for the columns being null. It works, but the performance will not be as good - possibly worse that using IN with correlated subqueries. –  OMG Ponies Sep 10 '09 at 17:50
select *
from Common c
where not exists (select t1.commonid from table1 t1 where t1.commonid = c.commonid)
and not exists (select t2.commonid from table2 t2 where t2.commonid = c.commonid)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 -- see my answer for why. –  Austin Salonen Sep 10 '09 at 18:32

Let's suppose these values for common_id:

Common - 1
Table1 - 2
Table2 - 3, null

We want the row in Common to return, because it doesn't exist in any of the other tables. However, the null throws in a monkey wrench.

With those values, the query is equivalent to:

select *
from Common
where 1 not in (2)
and 1 not in (3, null)

That is equivalent to:

select *
from Common
where not (1=2)
and not (1=3 or 1=null)

This is where the problem starts. When comparing with a null, the answer is unknown. So the query reduces to

select *
from Common
where not (false)
and not (false or unkown)

false or unknown is unknown:

select *
from Common
where true
and not (unknown)

true and not unkown is also unkown:

select *
from Common
where unknown

The where condition does not return records where the result is unkown, so we get no records back.

One way to deal with this is to use the exists operator rather than in. Exists never returns unkown because it operates on rows rather than columns. (A row either exists or it doesn't; none of this null ambiguity at the row level!)

select *
from Common
where not exists (select common_id from Table1 where common_id = Common.common_id)
and not exists (select common_id from Table2 where common_id = Common.common_id)
share|improve this answer

this worked for me :)

select * from Common

where

common_id not in (select ISNULL(common_id,'dummy-data') from Table1)

and common_id not in (select ISNULL(common_id,'dummy-data') from Table2)

share|improve this answer
select *,
(select COUNT(ID)  from ProductMaster where ProductMaster.CatID = CategoryMaster.ID) as coun 
from CategoryMaster
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.