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Say i have a text file that says:

User: John

Device: 12345

Date: 12/12/12

EDIT* I have my code to successfully search for a word, and display the info after that word. However when i try to edit the code to search for 2 or 3 words and display the info after them instead of just 1 word, i cannot get it to work. I have tried adding codes into the same while loop, and creating a new while loop for the other word, but both doesn't work. There must be something i am doing wrong/not doing. Please advice, thanks!

Here is my code:

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <string.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>
 int main() {

char file[100];
char c[100];

printf ("Enter file name and directory:");
scanf ("%s",file);

    FILE * fs = fopen (file, "r") ;
    if ( fs == NULL )
    {
           puts ( "Cannot open source file" ) ;
           exit( 1 ) ;
    }

    FILE * ft = fopen ( "book5.txt", "w" ) ;
    if ( ft == NULL )
    {
           puts ( "Cannot open target file" ) ;
           exit( 1 ) ;
    }

while(!feof(fs)) {
   char *Data;
   char *Device;
   char const * rc = fgets(c, 99, fs);

   if(rc==NULL) { break; }

   if((Data = strstr(rc, "Date:"))!= NULL)
   printf(Data+5);

   if((Data = strstr(rc, "Device:"))!=NULL)
   printf(Device+6);
   }



    fclose ( fs ) ;
    fclose ( ft ) ;

return 0;

 }
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1  
Please correct your code: printf(Data[5]; –  Mihai Stancu Dec 27 '12 at 22:36
1  
printf(Data[5]) is incorrect. Data[5] is not a pointer for one. Look at the documentation for printf. –  Diego Basch Dec 27 '12 at 22:39
    
And also if he did printf(Data) wasn't incorrect but deprecated. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 27 '12 at 22:40
    
This because fgetc reads a single character. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 27 '12 at 22:41
    
Fixed, thank you! –  Dave Wang Dec 27 '12 at 23:00
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9 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, hope I can clear it this time. Sorry if I get confusing sometimes but my english is not the best.

I'll explain the implementation inside comments:

#define BUFFSIZE 1024
int main()....

char buff[BUFFSIZE];
char delims[] = " ";  /*Where your strtok will split the string*/
char *result = NULL;
char *device; /*To save your device - in your example: 12345*/
char *date; /*To save the date*/
int stop = 0;

fp = fopen("yourFile", "r");

while( fgets(buff, BUFFSIZE,fp) != NULL )  /*This returns null when the file is over*/
{
 result = strtok( buff, delims );   /*You just need to do reference to buff here, after this, strtok uses delims to know where to do the next token*/

   while(result != NULL){   /*Strtok returns null when finishes reading the given string*/
      if(strcmp(result,"Device")==0){   /*strcmp returns 0 if the strings are equal*/
         result = strtok(NULL, delims); /*this one gets the 12345*/
         device = (char*)malloc((strlen(result)+1)*sizeof(char)); /*Alocate the right amount of memory for the variable device*/
         strcpy(device, result); /*Now, device is "12345"*/
      }
       /*Here you do the same but for the string 'Date'*/
       if(strcmp(result,"Date")==0){   /*strcmp returns 0 if the strings are equal*/
         result = strtok(NULL, delims); /*this one gets the 12345*/
         date = (char*)malloc((strlen(result)+1)*sizeof(char)); /*Alocate the right amount of memory for the variable device*/
         strcpy(date, result); /*Now, device is "12/12/12"*/
      }
      /*And you can repeat the if statement for every string you're looking for*/
      result = strtok(NULL,delims);  /*Get the next token*/
   }
}

/*No strtok necessary here */

...

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
It works great now! Thanks! Looks like the part i was missing was that i have to declare the size of the destination string before copying to it (i guess that is always the case when using c?). Thank you very much for your help. I really learned a lot from this. –  Dave Wang Dec 28 '12 at 22:29
    
Quick question, what is the (result = strtok(NULL,delims);) at the end of the codes for? Why does it need to get the next token if the values i want is already stored in "date" and "device"? –  Dave Wang Dec 28 '12 at 22:30
1  
Anytime. I'm getting addicted to stack overflow because of this: collective learning. And yes, in C, if you want to store you need space for it. Is you want to point you just need a pointer. Good luck! –  Afonso Tsukamoto Dec 28 '12 at 22:31
    
The one after the if statements? That one is for result getting the next tok. It increases result like a pointer to the string. If this one wasn't there you wouldn't be able to get the next token from the buff string. –  Afonso Tsukamoto Dec 28 '12 at 22:33
1  
And that \n character doesn't need to be on your code, it is read from the file from strtok and saved on your variable. –  Afonso Tsukamoto Dec 28 '12 at 23:06
show 17 more comments

@Afonso Tsukamoto: Thanks again. I played around with the code a bit, and came down to this. It compiles but after running it, it gets me stuck in input mode.. Is there something im doing wrong here?

  #include <stdio.h>
  #include <string.h>
  #include <stdlib.h>
  int main() {

   char file[100];
   char buff[100];
   char delims[] = " :";
   char *result = NULL;
   char *result2;
   char *result3;
   int stop = 0;

printf ("Enter file name and directory:");
scanf ("%s",file);

    FILE * fs = fopen (file, "r") ;
    if ( fs == NULL )
    {
           puts ( "Cannot open source file" ) ;
           exit( 1 ) ;
    }

    FILE * ft = fopen ( "book5.txt", "w" ) ;
    if ( ft == NULL )
    {
           puts ( "Cannot open target file" ) ;
           exit( 1 ) ;
    }

while( fgets(buff, 100,fs) != NULL )      
{   
result = strtok( buff, delims );          

while(result != NULL){                 

    if(stop==0) {
            if(strcmp(result,"Device")==0){ 
        result = strtok(NULL,delims);
        stop++; 
        result2 = result; 
        }                 
    }
    if(stop==1) {
        if(strcmp(result,"Date")==0) {
        result = strtok(NULL,delims);
        stop++; 
        result3 = result;
        }
    }
    else break;
    }


if(stop == 2) break;                    
}


printf(result2);

printf(result3);



    fclose ( fs ) ;
    fclose ( ft ) ;

return 0;

 }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, first at all, your else inside the loop is not opening curly brackets. Besides that, my idea was for two different implementations, and you've mixed them. Since you're doing the extra tok inside the if statement, you dont need the stop. Another thing, since your rsult is a pointer, saving your results with equals just saves de pointer. Since it is a pointer from the beggining, if buff is exchanged, the rsult is changed too. Try to do that with static strings(char str[SIZE];) and use strcpy() to copy its value. –  Afonso Tsukamoto Dec 28 '12 at 2:06
add comment

My suggestion is to use fread to read all the file.You could read it character by character, but IMHO (a personal taste here) it's simpler to get a string containing all the characters and then manipulating it.

This is the function prototype:

size_t fread ( void * ptr, size_t size, size_t count, FILE * stream );

It returns the number of elements read.

For example:

char buffer[100];
size_t n= fread(buffer, 1,100, fs);  

Then you can manipulate the string and divide it in tokens.

EDIT

There is a nice reference with also an example of how dividing a string into tokens here:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strtok/

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, i have fixed and added this part to my code. With out the searching for word part, the code compiles and does what it's supposed to do. Would you recommend a command i could use to search for a word from the text file and display the info after it? Thanks a lot! –  Dave Wang Dec 27 '12 at 23:02
    
Yes, I would recommend strtok(), I edited the post to add also the reference. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 27 '12 at 23:45
add comment

@Dave Wang My answer was too big to be a comment. So here it goes:

You're welcome. Glad to help.

If you make a new loop, the fgets won't work because you are already 'down' in the text file. Imagine something like a pointer to the file, every time you 'fget it' from a file pointer, you advance that pointer. You have functions to reload the file or push that pointer up, but it is not efficient, you've already passed by the information you want, there must be a way to know when.

If you're using my implementation, that is done by using another string compare inside the loop: if(strcmp(result,"date") == 0) If you enter this if, you know that the next value in result token with strtok is the actual date. Since you have now two conditions to be tested, you can't break the outer loop before having both of them. This can be accomplished by two ways:

1-Instead of a flag, use a counter that is incremented everytime you want an information. If that counter has the same number of information you want, you can break the outer loop.

2-Don't break the outer loop at all! :)

But in both, since there are 2 conditions, make sure you treat them inside the ifs so you know that you dealing with the right information.

Hope this helps. Anything, just ask.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again, i posted a question for you as a new answer because it was too long, too. –  Dave Wang Dec 28 '12 at 0:51
add comment

I would do that with two loops: one to get a line from the file and other to make tokens from the line read.

something like:

#define BUFFSIZE 1024
int main()....

char buff[BUFFSIZE];
char delims[] = " ";
char *result = NULL;
int stop = 0;

fp = fopen("yourFile", "r");

while( fgets(buff, BUFFSIZE,fp) != NULL )  /*This returns null when the file is over*/
{
 result = strtok( buff, delims );   /*You just need to do reference to buff here, after this, strtok uses delims to know where to do the next token*/

   while(result != NULL){   /*Strtok returns null when finishes reading the given string*/
      if(strcmp(result,"Device")==0){   /*strcmp returns 0 if the strings are equal*/
         stop = 1;  /*Update the flag*/
         break;     /*Is now possible to break the loop*/
      }
      result = strtok(NULL,delims);  /*Get the next token*/
   }
   if(stop == 1) break; /*This uses the inside flag to stop the outer loop*/
}


result = strtok(NULL, delims); /*Result, now, has the string you want: 12345 */

...

this code is not very accurate and I didn't tested it, but thats how I would try to do it.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, i fixed my code a bit and now it works. But i do have one more question, i am trying to get it to search and display more than 1 words now, say i want it to display the info after both "device" and "date", how would i go about doing that? I have tried adding the info in the same while loop, or creating a new while loop, both did not work.. thanks –  Dave Wang Dec 27 '12 at 23:22
    
According this your original code here, the first time (result = strtok(NULL,delims);) is used, which was inside of the "if", sets result to "Device" correct? and the 2nd time it was used which is outside of the outer loop sets it to "12345", is that correct? –  Dave Wang Dec 28 '12 at 19:27
1  
No, strtok is used inside the seconde loop, but outside the if statement. It breaks the inner loop the first time result finds Device[ if(strcmp(result,"Device")==0)], and the outer strtok(outer as out of both loops) to get the 12345 string. So,what your saying is not entirely wrong, it ends up doing that, but does more iterations to get to that. –  Afonso Tsukamoto Dec 28 '12 at 20:15
    
SO if i was to add another value to compare with, should i make another if statement with-in the inner while loop? Because i tried having another (result = strtok(NULL,delims);) inside of the inner while loop, thinking that it would just jump to the next value, but it doesn't do anything.. –  Dave Wang Dec 28 '12 at 21:38
    
I guess my question was, if the only time "result" has the value i am looking for is when it is outside of the outer while loop, then how will i be able to get the value i want, and store it into somewhere while inside of the while loops? –  Dave Wang Dec 28 '12 at 21:51
show 1 more comment

If printf() isn't a hard/fast rule, and the input requirements are really this simple, I'd prefer a state-machine and a constant-memory input:

int c, x = 0;                              // c is character, x is state
while(EOF!=(c=getchar())){                 // scanner entry point
  if(c == '\n') x=0;                       // newline resets scanner
  else if(x == -1) continue;               // -1 is invalid state
  else if (x < 7 && c=="Device:"[x])x++;   // advance state
  else if (x == 7 && isspace(c)) continue; // skip leading/trailing whitespace
  else if (x == 7) putchar(c);             // successful terminator (exits at \n)
  else x = -1;                             // otherwise move to invalid state
}
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add comment

There are a couple of problems in your code: basically it never compiled.

Here is a version with small cleanups - which at least compiles:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {
    char file[100];
    char c[100];

    printf ("Enter file name and directory:");
    scanf ("%s",file);

    FILE * fs = fopen (file, "r") ;
    if ( fs == NULL ) {
       puts( "Cannot open source file" ) ;
       exit(1 ) ;
    }

    while(!feof(fs)) {
       char *Data;
       char const * rc = fgets(c, 99, fs);
       if(rc==NULL) { break; }
       if((Data = strstr(rc, "Device"))!= NULL)
       printf("%s", Data);
    }

    fclose ( fs ) ;

    return 0;
 }

Problems I found:

  • Missing include for exit()
  • Missing parameter for exit()
  • Missing while loop to run through the whole input file.
  • The output file was never used.
  • Missing return value of 'main'
  • Fancy Data[5]
  • Changed fgetc() to fgets()

I only did minimal edits - it's not perfect at all....

IMHO I would go for C++: many things are much simpler there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much taking time to fix my sloppy code. I am fairly new and is still trying to learn C in more details. Your code works great. I can proceed to my next task now. Just a couple of questions tho about your code, I understand that adding a * makes the command a pointer, is that correct? And what is "rc" for? I see that you declared c to be a 100 bit long char? is this c and rc related at all or no? THanks! –  Dave Wang Dec 27 '12 at 23:11
    
I answered as answer because my explanation was too big for a comment. –  Afonso Tsukamoto Dec 27 '12 at 23:40
add comment

fgetc returns an integer value, which is character, promoted to int. I suppose you meant fgets which reads a whole line, but you need to reserve memory for it, for example:

#define BUF 100
...
char c[BUF];
fgets(c, BUF, fs);

Some helpful links.

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c and Data are char-pointers, pointers to (the start of a list of) character value(s).

fgetc's prototype is int fgetc ( FILE * stream ); meaning that it returns (one) integer value (an integer is convertible to a single char value).

If fgetc's prototype would've been int * fgetc ( FILE * stream ); the warning wouldn't have appeared.

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