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I'm trying to write simple C# function with generics. Array parser for example.

public static int parse_array <T> ( string str, ref T[] array ) 
    where T : IConvertible<T>
{
    string[] vals=str.Split(new char[]{'','\t',',',';'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

    if( vals==null || vals.Length==0 )
        return 0;

    array = new T[vals.Length];

    for( int i=0; i<vals.Length; i++ )
    {
        array[i] = Convert.ChangeType ( vals[i], T );
    }

    return vals.Length; 
}

but I got error: The non-generic type 'System.IConvertable' cannot be used with the type argument. What's wrong ?

share|improve this question
2  
FYI, C# doesn't have templates. It has "generics". They're not the same as C++ templates. – John Saunders Dec 27 '12 at 22:52
    
Be sure to fix your Convert.ChangeType line as well, it should read array[i] = Convert.ChangeType ( vals[i], typeof(T) ); (notice the typeof) – Chris Sinclair Dec 27 '12 at 22:54
    
Another error: Another error: Cannot implicitly convert type 'object' to 'T'. An explicit conversion exist (are you missing cast ?) – Newbee Dec 27 '12 at 23:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem with your specific compiler error is that IConvertible is not a generic interface, your clause should be:

where T : IConvertible

not

where T : IConvertible<T>

Indeed, the compiler error is telling you you are trying to put type arguments (that is, <T>) on a non-generic type (that is, the interface IConvertible). While some interfaces are generic or have a generic parallel, IConvertible isn't one of them.

Then, in addition, you'll want to use typeof(T) instead of T in your call to ChangeType, since T is a type-name and not an instance of Type as Chris mentions...

share|improve this answer
    
"Then, in addition, you'll want to use typeof(T) instead of T in your call to ChangeType, since T is a type-name and not an instance of Type as Chris mentions..." I changed code to: array[i] = Convert.ChangeType ( vals[i], typeof(T) ); Another error: Cannot implicitly convert type 'object' to 'T'. An explicit conversion exist (are you missing cast ?) – Newbee Dec 27 '12 at 23:03
    
Yes, ChangeType() returns object, not an instance of T, so you'll need to cast: array[i] = (T)Convert.ChangeType(vals[i], typeof(T)); – James Michael Hare Dec 27 '12 at 23:06
    
That is, it returns vals[i] converted to type T but returned as an object which you must then cast to type T (just a type-cast, is not a conversion cast at this point). – James Michael Hare Dec 27 '12 at 23:08
    
Thanks! This helped – Newbee Dec 27 '12 at 23:15

I see that this has already been answered, guess I was a bit slow. But i added a simpler implementation of the Array conversion.

public static int parse_array<T>(string str, ref T[] array) where T : IConvertible
{
    string[] vals = str.Split(new char[] { '\t', ',', ';' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

    if (vals == null || vals.Length == 0)
        return 0;

    array = Array.ConvertAll<string, T>(vals, (o) => (T)Convert.ChangeType(o, typeof(T)));

    return vals.Length;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot !! – Newbee Dec 27 '12 at 23:17

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