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I am trying to create a subroutine that returns data as a pointer:

I want something like that:

subroutine f(p)
     type(tra), pointer p
     type(tra), target :: instance

     p=>instance
     do_work(instance)
end subroutine

Strictly speaking I want to implement analogue of c++ "new" operator.

I want then to use such a subroutine as follows:

subroutine other
    type(tra), pointer :: p1,p2
    call f(p1)
    call f(p2)
end subroutine

The above code may not work, as I suppose "instance" inside f is destroyed after f quits, and the next call of f creates "instance" again in the same place in memory.

In particular I find with p1 and p2 pointing to the same objects, but I guess this is compiler-dependent. Is it true?

I think that a possible solution is:

subroutine f(p)
     type(tra), pointer p
     type(tra), allocatable, target :: instance(:)

     p=>instance(1)
     do_work(instance(1))
end subroutine

Is this the "official" way of doing things?

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Is there a particular reason that the data must be returned as a pointer? In the absence of such a particular reason, the better way in modern Fortran (F2003+) is to make the argument ALLOCATABLE. –  IanH Dec 30 '12 at 22:04
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Strictly speaking I want to implement analogue of c++ "new" operator.

It is ALLOCATE. The thing you are trying to do should be simply this:

subroutine f(p)
     type(tra), pointer :: p

     ! you can actually leak memory this way! caution required.
     if(associated(p)) then
         stop "possible memory leak - p was associated"
     end
     allocate(p)
     do_work(p)
end subroutine

The above code may not work, as I suppose "instance" inside f is destroyed after f quits, and the next call of f creates "instance" again in the same place in memory.

No, this is not true. Local subroutine variables are usually "allocated" once (and even initialized only once), see e.g. Fortran 90 spec, chapter 14, especially section 14.7.

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In your example, when the ASSOCIATED intrinsic is called the pointer association status of p is undefined. It is against the language rules to call ASSOCIATED with such a pointer. The type declaration statement for p in the example is missing a double colon. The call to do_work has instance as an actual argument - should that be p? The OP's supposition about about the lifetime of instance in their first example code is correct in the context in which it appears. –  IanH Dec 30 '12 at 21:50
    
@IanH, I fixed obvious typos in code. Regarding the association status of the subroutine argument, you are right indeed that strictly speaking this code must not compile if the subroutine f is used with an undefined pointer. But this pointer may be defined if the caller declared the corresponding variable with initial null association (which is highly recommended anyway). Regarding the lifetime of local variable, Fortran standard does not require any specific lifetime for the local variables which do not have a save attribute, so this is implementation dependent. –  abbot Dec 31 '12 at 13:00
    
Perhaps I misread things. For clarity, what the OP was suggesting "may not work" is definitely illegal. Unsaved local variables become undefined when execution of the subprogram terminates (F2003 even allows you to observe the "end of lifetime" of some local variables through finalization - more or less the equivalent of destruction in C++) and a pointer pointing at an unsaved local variable becomes undefined when execution of the subprogram terminates. Implementation choices around where variables are stored might hide this programming error, but it is still an error. –  IanH Dec 31 '12 at 23:37
    
So the "assiciate" code is ok, with the typos fixed, moreover to be sure it does not crash pointers that are passed do "subroutine f" should be declared : TYPE(tra), POINTER :: VEC => NULL () ?? –  Lacek Jan 1 '13 at 10:16
    
@Lacek, Yes, associated bit is ok if passed pointers are always initialized (defined). Anyway, using Fortran pointers for anything more complex then a linked list/hash table is usually too error-prone and compiler-dependent, and is often better done using allocatable arrays. –  abbot Jan 1 '13 at 12:21
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