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I have a GCD that goes on the background. I have a button that when pressed I want it to load a loading wait screen while the GCD finishes, and then execute the rest of the code on that button. Attached is the sample.

Mine does not work, I basically want to say, wait as long as it takes to finish GCD, and load a waiting message in the meantime, when done continue code.

Thank you

- (IBAction)btnTapped:(id)sender
{
    shouldCancel=NO;
    dispatch_queue_t existingQueque = dispatch_get_main_queue();//finds the current GCD, the one I created in a different method
    dispatch_group_t group =dispatch_group_create();

    dispatch_group_async(group, existingQueque, ^
    {
        dispatch_group_wait(group, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);//does not work, I guess group can't be created here.
        [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(showWaitViewWithMessage:) withObject:@"Loading" waitUntilDone:YES];//load this until GCD queque done

        [self performSelector:@selector(performSearch) withObject:nil afterDelay:0];
    });    
}
share|improve this question
2  
dispatch_get_main_queue gets you the main queue created by the system and serviced on the main thread. It does not get a queue you have created yourself – combinatorial Dec 27 '12 at 23:44
    
so how do i say "is there an active queue? if so, wait until its done" – William Falcon Dec 27 '12 at 23:45
2  
You can't. If you need to reference a queue you create, the you need to keep the reference to the queue. – combinatorial Dec 27 '12 at 23:50
    
Agreed. The typical solution would be to store your created queue in an ivar and reference that in your code. Or just use a dispatch_get_global_queue. – Rob Dec 28 '12 at 5:30
up vote 5 down vote accepted

A couple of thoughts:

  1. You suggest that dispatch_get_main_queue() "finds the current GCD, the one I created in a different method". No, this just gets the main queue (the one that, if you use it, will block your user interface), not the queue that you created elsewhere through dispatch_create_queue. The dispatch_get_main_queue() just gets the main queue, and while your searching is happening, your UI will be blocked (e.g. UIActivityIndicatorView won't spin, whatever).

  2. If you've dispatched a whole bunch of tasks to a background queue, if you want to wait for all of them to finish, that's when you use dispatch_group_t or dispatch_barrier, but given what you've shown doesn't require that (you have only one dispatched operation), you just don't need to go there. By the way, barriers are not recommended if you're using global queues.

  3. The typical pattern for a single GCD background task is more simple than your question suggests. You (a) update your UI to say "loading" and show a UIActivityIndicatorView or something like that, so the user has a richer UX showing them that the app is working on something; (b) dispatch the search in the background; and (c) when done, dispatch the UI update back to the main queue. Thus, the typical pattern is:

    - (IBAction)btnTapped:(id)sender
    {
        dispatch_queue_t backgroundQueue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
    
        // or, if you've already created you own background queue just use that here, 
        // or just create one here. But don't use dispatch_get_main_queue, as that 
        // won't use a background queue.
        //
        // dispatch_queue_t backgroundQueue = dispatch_queue_create("org.yourdomain.yourapp.search", NULL);
    
        [self showWaitViewWithMessage:@"Loading"];
    
        dispatch_async(backgroundQueue, ^{
            [self performSearch];             // do this in the background
            dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                [self updateUiAfterSearch];   // when done, dispatch UI update back to main queue
            });
        });
    
        // if you created a queue, remember to release it
        //
        // dispatch_release(backgroundQueue); 
    }
    
  4. As an aside, in your performSelectorOnMainThread, I see no reason to waitUntilDone. Don't wait unless there is some compelling reason to do so. As you see above, this construct isn't needed at all, but just a FYI.

  5. By the way, it's important to know that many servers impose limits on how many concurrent requests a given client may make at a time. If it's possible that you might be initiating multiple requests (e.g. the user taps buttons and the server is slow to respond) and this allows them to run concurrently. In this scenario, it's worth pursuing NSOperationQueue, where you can set maxConcurrentOperationCount. If you use the block versions of the NSOperationQueue methods (e.g. addOperationWithBlock rather than GCD's dispatch_async), the code can be structured in the same way, but it let's you constrain the number of background operations.

    Also, NSOperationQueue offers the ability to easily establish dependencies between the operations (e.g. a completion NSOperation that is dependent on all of the others finishing). I can outline that, but the code you posted doesn't necessitate that, so I'll spare you that unless you let me know you want to see what that would look like.

share|improve this answer

you have to save the queue you create, dont create it each time and if you only want one at a time, use a serial queue


 @implementation DDAppDelegate {
     dispatch_queue_t queue;
 }

 - (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
 {
     [self do];
     [self performSelector:@selector(do) withObject:nil afterDelay:1];
 }

 - (void)do {
     if(!queue)
         queue = dispatch_queue_create("com.example.MyQueue", NULL);

     dispatch_async(queue, ^{
         //serialized
         NSLog(@"1");
         sleep(10);
     });
 }
 @end

if you want a concurrent queue, use a global queue and dispatch_barrier_async

@implementation DDAppDelegate

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    [self do];
    [self performSelector:@selector(do) withObject:nil afterDelay:1];
}

- (void)do {
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_BACKGROUND, 0);

    dispatch_barrier_async(queue, ^{
        //serialized
        NSLog(@"1");
        sleep(10);
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
As an aside, I don't think it's recommended to user barriers on global queues. If you're really worried about coordinating concurrent background queue, either use the undocumented dispatch_create_queue features that let you create a concurrent queue, or, better, use NSOperationQueue which let's you create background concurrent queues and coordinate operations through dependencies. – Rob Dec 28 '12 at 5:21

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