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Ok, so here's the entire structure I'm trying to create. I need to create an anonymous array that I can use as a hash value. This works in my program:

$result = {
    count, 2,
    elementList, [
        {name => "John Doe", age => 23},
        {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24}
    ]
};

I'm trying to create the exact same thing with code like this. This works:

my @elements = [
     {name => "John Doe", age => 23},
     {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24}
];

$result = {
    count, 2,
    elementList, @elements
};

But this does NOT work:

my @elements;
push(@elements, {name => "John Doe", age => 23});
push(@elements, {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24});

$result = {
    count, 2,
    elementList, @elements
};
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2  
If the rest of your code breaks with the brackets, the problem is probably over there. Bring it in the question if you also need help about it. –  JB. Sep 10 '09 at 16:30
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As others have mentioned, you're describing an unusual data structure: an array with only one element, which is an arrayref of hashrefs. I'll assume that you really do want that structure for some reason.

my @elements = [
    {name => "John Doe", age => 23},
    {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24}
];

is equivalent to

my @elements = [];
push(@{ $elements[0] }, {name => "John Doe", age => 23});
push(@{ $elements[0] }, {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24});

because you want to push the hashrefs onto the arrayref in $elements[0], not the @elements array.

But it's unusual to have an array with only one element. Looking at the additional code you've posted, what you really want is this:

my $elementsRef = [];
push(@$elementsRef, {name => "John Doe", age => 23});
push(@$elementsRef, {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24});

Or this:

my @elements;
push(@elements, {name => "John Doe", age => 23});
push(@elements, {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24});

and then use \@elements where you currently use @elements.

Either one of those will work. It's up to you to decide which one you prefer. I'd probably go with the second version.

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You are assigning an array reference (the [] syntax) to your array. As a first and only element since you don't specify any others.

You wanted to directly assign a list there, using parentheses () instead of the square brackets.

Check out perldsc for an introduction on the subject.

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+1 for mentioning perldsc –  William Pursell Sep 10 '09 at 16:30
    
The parenthesis are superfluous. You might say @array=() to empty an array, but you never need 'my @array=()' –  runrig Sep 10 '09 at 16:31
    
@runrig: I was actually talking about the parentheses in the first code excerpt, the one where he describes the structure he wants... I agree with you about array creation. –  JB. Sep 10 '09 at 16:34
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Wrong brackets.

You actually need to build a structure like this:

my @elements = (
    {name => "John Doe", age => 23},
    {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24}
);

To do it in a loop, you will need to modify this code:

my @elements;  # same as my @elements = ();
push(@elements, {name => "John Doe", age => 23});
push(@elements, {name => "Jane Doe", age => 24});

The reason is that the square brackets build a reference to an array. A reference to an array is not the same thing as an array.

To make a list of elements to assign to an array, use round brackets ().

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[] makes a reference to an empty array. You are creating an array with one element. Just say:my @elements; to make an empty array.

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