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I'm running into a problem with the following pseudoquery:

var daily = from p in db.table1
            group p by new
            {
                key1,
                key2
            } into g
            join d in db.table2
            on new { p.key1, p.key2 } equals { d.key1, d.key2 }
            select new
            {
                col1 = g.Key.key1
                col2 = g.Sum(a => a.column2)
                col3 = d.column3
            };

It runs but the generated SQL statement that LINQ sends to SQL Server is absurd. The actual implementation follows a similar setup as above with 7 or so more columns that each have a .Sum() calculation. The generated SQL has somewhere around 10-11 nested SELECT statements with no INNER JOIN and, of course, takes forever to run.

I tested out another implementation of the query:

var daily = from p in
                (from p in db.table1
                 group p by new
                 {
                     key1,
                     key2
                 } into g
                 select new
                 {
                     col1 = g.Key.key1,
                     col2 = g.Sum(a => a.column2)
                 })
            join d in db.table2
            on new { p.key1, p.key2 } equals new { d.key1, d.key2 }
            select new
            {
                col1 = p.col1,
                col2 = p.col2,
                col3 = d.column3
            };

This version generates far more reasonable SQL with a single SUB-SELECT and an INNER JOIN statement (it also runs damn near instantly). The thing I hate about this is that the first LINQ query is, IMHO, far more straight-forward and concise whereas the second seems rather redundant since I end up having to define all the columns I want from table1 twice.

Why do these two similar queries perform so much differently on the server and why does query 2 end up being far more efficient even though it's code is far less expressive?

Is there a way I can rewrite the first query to be as efficient as the second?

share|improve this question
    
Can you post the SQL of both versions? –  usr Dec 28 '12 at 0:12
    
@usr Sure, let me try to clean it up a bit first like I did for the LINQ queries. –  Kittoes Dec 28 '12 at 0:13
    
@Kittoes You can use LinqPad to write Linq and get the Lambda and SQL code –  balexandre Dec 28 '12 at 0:14
    
@balexandre I have the SQL code by using query.ToString(). I just want to make it a bit more user-readable before posting. –  Kittoes Dec 28 '12 at 0:15
    
You are not using EF, right? The tag is contradicting the L2S tag. Please remove one of them. –  usr Dec 28 '12 at 0:19
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

LINQ 2 SQL has a problem with the following pattern:

from t in table
group t by key into g
from t in g //"ungroup" the grouping - this is causing a problem
select ...

I think your join is triggering that because it "ungroups" the grouping. Note that a LINQ join is a GroupJoin which is unrepresentable in SQL. Think about it: How would you translate my example query? You have to join table to a grouped version of table causing insane redundancy.

I have seen this problem a few times. You have found the correct work-around: Force a projection to prevent this pattern from occurring.

There is a slightly less awkward version:

var daily = from p in db.table1
            group p by new
            {
                key1,
                key2
            } into g
            select new
            {
                col1 = g.Key.key1,
                col2 = g.Sum(a => a.column2)
            } into p
            join d in db.table2 on new { p.key1, p.key2 } equals new { d.key1, d.key2 }
            select new
            {
                col1 = p.col1,
                col2 = p.col2,
                col3 = d.column3
            };

The nesting is removed by the lesser known select x into y syntax.

share|improve this answer
    
Damn, I was really hoping that that wasn't the answer. I REALLY hate having to define all of my columns in table1 twice just to get one column out of table2. But I suppose it doesn't look like I have any choice in the matter. –  Kittoes Dec 28 '12 at 0:22
    
@Kittoes that's also my feeling about this. On the other hand LINQ saves so much work that it is worth tolerating these nasty edge cases. I wish the EF team would deliver competent LINQ support or L2S was not abandoned... –  usr Dec 28 '12 at 0:28
1  
Oh, for sure. The amount of other work that LINQ saves is absolutely ridiculous so it's totally worth tolerating stuff like this when it happens. Just drives me insane defining 10 columns+ twice for no real reason. Thank you very much for explaining WHY it was happening. –  Kittoes Dec 28 '12 at 0:31
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