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So, I have this project, due soon, and I'm afraid I don't quite grasp the concept of thread synchronization. Actually, I can't seem to get it at all, so if my question is stupid - I apologize in advance.

The idea is simple - I have multiple threads representing animals (Antilope, Lion, etc. extends Animal implements Runnable), and a 2D array of Tile objects. The animals need to move without collisions - if one wants to move to a tile where another stands, it should interact() with it, and then - if the other doesn't die - wait until it moves away.

So, when an animal moves, it apparently needs to be synchronized on target tile, so that no two animals can simultaneously enter one tile. However, when it moves, it apparently needs to call notify() on a tile it was standing on, so that other animals who wanted to move there can awake.

I tried locking on both, but the result was that animals were stopping dead in their tracks for no apparent reason. Here's a piece of code, for a little clarification:

void move(dir direction)
{
    Integer tarX = ((direction==dir.east?(x+1):(direction==dir.west?(x-1):x))); // east->x+1/west->x-1/NS->x
    Integer tarY = ((direction==dir.north?(y-1):(direction==dir.south?(y+1):y))); //see above
    Animal an;
    synchronized(TileManager.getInstance().playField[tarX][tarY])
    {

            an = AnimalManager.getInstance().searchByXY(tarX, tarY);   
            while (an != null)
            {                    
                interact(an); //assume it's empty - if it isn't, it results in a death of target animal anyway                
                an = AnimalManager.getInstance().searchByXY(tarX, tarY); //possibly redundant?
                if (an != null) {
                    try {
                        TileManager.getInstance().playField[tarX][tarY].wait();
                    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    }
                }
                an = AnimalManager.getInstance().searchByXY(tarX, tarY, dir.none);
            }
        synchronized(TileManager.getInstance().playField[x][y])
        {
                int prevX = x;
                int prevY = y;
                x = tarX;
                y = tarY;
                TileManager.getInstance().playField[prevX][prevY].notify();
                TileManager.getInstance().playField[x][y].notify();
        }
    }
}

Yeah, it's a mess, I know, and it doesn't work so well either. Anyone have any idea on what to do?

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Don't put one synchronized block inside another (unless you have no choice). If you feel the need to, modify the state inside the synchronized block, then exit it. (It's okay if an animal is momentarily in two spaces, I think.) –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 0:14
    
That is something I tried to do (aside from having an animal momentarily in two spaces - coordinates of an animal are stored in its object, and all animals are stored in a separate collection, not inside the tiles). What happens here, though, is that I obtain the lock on (x,y) only to call notify(), what seems to make no sense, but I can't notify animals waiting for that tile without it. –  Maciej Stachowski Dec 28 '12 at 0:34
    
you have a potential deadlock animal in playField[x][y] and playField[tarX][tarY] could potentially stop each other. –  BevynQ Dec 28 '12 at 0:42
    
@MaciejStachowski: Yep, locking only to notify is a definite warning sign. You should be locking to remove yourself from the tile and then calling notify. (Just make sure you reserve the tile you're going to move into first!) –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 0:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You will have to see if the performance of this solution will be OK, but you can introduce some kind of 'Arbiter' object that you have to lock in order to get synchronized access to any PlayField.

The pattern would be:

private static final Object arbiter = new Object( );

void move(dir direction)
{
  ...
  TileManager tileManager = TileManager.getInstance( );

  synchronized( arbiter )
  {
    PlayField tarXtarYField = tileManager.playField[tarX][tarY];

    synchronized( tarXtarYField )
    {
      ...

      PlayField xyField = tileManager.playField[x][y];
      synchronized( xyField )
      {
        ...
        tileManager.playField[prevX][prevY].notify();
        xyField.notify();
      }
    }
  }
}

This pattern will help you to avoid the deadlock, but at a price of slower moving game, as essentially access to play fields is serialized through arbiter object, so only 1 thread at a time can move.

If the field is not too large and the number of animals is small, the performance may well be acceptable. If it is not, then you really have to rewrite this program from scratch.

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