Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a stacked bar chart with multiple variables, but I am stuck on two issues:

1) I can't seem to get the rotated y-axis to display percentages instead of counts.

2) I would like to sort the variables (desc) based on the percentage of the "strongly agree" response.

Here is an example of what I have so far:

require(scales)
require(ggplot2)
require(reshape2)

# create data frame
  my.df <- data.frame(replicate(10, sample(1:4, 200, rep=TRUE)))
  my.df$id <- seq(1, 200, by = 1)

# melt
  melted <- melt(my.df, id.vars="id")

# factors
  melted$value <- factor(melted$value, 
                         levels=c(1,2,3,4),
                         labels=c("strongly disagree", 
                                  "disagree", 
                                  "agree", 
                                  "strongly agree"))
# plot
  ggplot(melted) + 
    geom_bar(aes(variable, fill=value, position="fill")) +
    scale_fill_manual(name="Responses",
                      values=c("#EFF3FF", "#BDD7E7", "#6BAED6",
                               "#2171B5"),
                      breaks=c("strongly disagree", 
                               "disagree", 
                               "agree", 
                               "strongly agree"),
                      labels=c("strongly disagree", 
                               "disagree", 
                               "agree", 
                               "strongly agree")) +
    labs(x="Items", y="Percentage (%)", title="my title") +
    coord_flip()

I owe thanks to several folks for help in getting this far. Here are a few of the many pages that Google served up:

http://www.r-bloggers.com/fumblings-with-ranked-likert-scale-data-in-r/

Create Stacked percent barplot in R

sessionInfo()
R version 2.15.0 (2012-03-30)
Platform: x86_64-apple-darwin9.8.0/x86_64 (64-bit)

locale:
[1] en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8/C/en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8

attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

other attached packages:
[1] reshape2_1.2.2  ggplot2_0.9.2.1 scales_0.2.2   

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
 [1] colorspace_1.2-0    dichromat_1.2-4     digest_0.6.0        grid_2.15.0         gtable_0.1.1        HH_2.3-23          
 [7] labeling_0.1        lattice_0.20-10     latticeExtra_0.6-24 MASS_7.3-22         memoise_0.1         munsell_0.4        
[13] plyr_1.7.1          proto_0.3-9.2       RColorBrewer_1.0-5  rstudio_0.97.237    stringr_0.6.1       tools_2.15.0       
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For (1)
To get percentages, you'll have to create a data.frame from melted. At least that's the way I could think of.

# 200 is the total sum always. Using that to get the percentage
require(plyr)
df <- ddply(melted, .(variable, value), function(x) length(x$value)/200 * 100)

Then supply the calculated percentages as weights in geom_bar as follows:

ggplot(df) + 
geom_bar(aes(variable, fill=value, weight=V1, position="fill")) +
scale_fill_manual(name="Responses",
                  values=c("#EFF3FF", "#BDD7E7", "#6BAED6",
                           "#2171B5"),
                  breaks=c("strongly disagree", 
                           "disagree", 
                           "agree", 
                           "strongly agree"),
                  labels=c("strongly disagree", 
                           "disagree", 
                           "agree", 
                           "strongly agree")) +
labs(x="Items", y="Percentage (%)", title="my title") +
coord_flip()

I don't quite understand (2). Do you want to (a) calculate relative percentages (with reference as "strongly agree"? Or (b) do you want always the plot to display "strongly agree", then "agree", etc.. You can accomplish (b) by just reordering factors in df by,

df$value <- factor(df$value, levels=c("strongly agree", "agree", "disagree", 
                 "strongly disagree"), ordered = TRUE)

Edit: You can reorder the levels of variable and value to the order you require as follows:

variable.order <- names(sort(daply(df, .(variable), 
                     function(x) x$V1[x$value == "strongly agree"] ), 
                     decreasing = TRUE))
value.order <- c("strongly agree", "agree", "disagree", "strongly disagree")
df$variable <- factor(df$variable, levels = variable.order, ordered = TRUE)
df$value <- factor(df$value, levels = value.order, ordered = TRUE)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! Your solution works, though I deleted * 100 in df <- ddply(melted, .(variable, value), function(x) length(x$value)/200 * 100) because the percentages along the rotated y-axis were 0-10,000% rather than 0-100%. On (2), I am looking to program the order of the variables along the rotated x-axis to start with the variable with the largest percentage of "strongly agree" at the top, so X8 (30.5%) in my example. Then X10 (27.5%), then X4 (26.0%)...finally X3 at the bottom (21.5%). –  Eric Green Dec 28 '12 at 3:49
    
@Arun I think Eric may be Euro, so the comma indicates the decimal point. –  Carl Witthoft Dec 28 '12 at 12:32
    
@Arun, yes, reordering the levels of variable and value as you suggest in your edit does the trick. I get the correct percentages with *100 time time. Must have slipped up somewhere last run. Many thanks. –  Eric Green Dec 29 '12 at 1:21
    
@Arun, You can set your Locale in .Rprofile I believe. Or some other startup file. –  Carl Witthoft Dec 29 '12 at 14:34

Since you are working with Likert data, you might want to consider the likert() function in package HH. (Hopefully it is ok to point you in another direction given that there is already a nice answer addressing your original ggplot2 approach.)

As one might hope, likert() plots in a likert-appropriate way with minimal struggle. PositiveOrder=TRUE will sort the items by how far they extend in the positive direction. The ReferenceZero argument will allow you to zero-center through the middle of a neutral item (not needed below but shown here). And as.percent=TRUE will convert counts into percents and list the actual counts in the margin (unless we turn that off).

library(reshape2)
library(HH)

# create data as before
my.df <- data.frame(replicate(10, sample(1:4, 200, rep=TRUE)))
my.df$id <- seq(1, 200, by = 1)

# melt() and dcast() with reshape2 package
melted <- melt(my.df,id.var="id", na.rm=TRUE)
summd <- dcast(data=melted,variable~value, length) # note: length()
                                                   # not robust if NAs present

# give names to cols and rows for likert() to use
names(summd) <- c("Question", "strongly disagree", 
                              "disagree", 
                              "agree", 
                              "strongly agree")
rownames(summd) <- summd[,1]  # question number as rowname
summd[,1] <- NULL             

# plot
likert(summd,
       as.percent=TRUE,       # automatically scales
       main = NULL,           # or give "title",
       xlab = "Percent",      # label axis
       positive.order = TRUE, # orders by furthest right
       ReferenceZero = 2.5,   # zero point btwn levels 2&3
       ylab = "Question",     # label for left side
       auto.key = list(space = "right", columns = 1,
                     reverse = TRUE)) # make positive items on top of legend

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
great idea! Thanks. Would you drop NAs if present, or is there another way to display without dropping? Also, in case others are wondering, I used the following to reassign the item names to row names so "1" becomes "X1": rownames(summd) <- summd[,1] summd[,1] <- NULL and then removed [,-1] after likert –  Eric Green Dec 28 '12 at 4:33
    
I would drop them as their absence will be clear from the row count totals. I often do it by using sum(!is.na()) instead of length() to count responses. (And +1 for pointing out the straightforward and less risky way to use row names for question numbers). –  MattBagg Dec 28 '12 at 4:49
    
I'm adding your rownames code into the answer and am putting a na.rm=TRUE into the melt() call to make the code more general. –  MattBagg Dec 28 '12 at 14:46
1  
Not certain this answer will satisfy you, but for casual viewing I just drag to resize the window (I am on Windows). And for reproducible plots, I am already saving it to a file and and specifying the file dimensions in pdf() or png(), which I believe handles your issue and may even be a more funadmental problem. Something like: png(file="figure1.png",width=400,height=350); likert(data); dev.off() HTH! –  MattBagg Dec 30 '12 at 19:22
1  
Specifying the output file size does the trick, thanks! To make it a bit more reproducible for plots with varying number of bars, I used pdf("output/figure1.pdf", height=ifelse((length(names(my.df))-1) > 4, .8*(length(names(my.df))-1), (length(names(my.df))-1))). A little clunky, but it works. I found that height=1.0*number of bars/variables works well until about 4 bars. So I multiply by 0.8 if the number of bars is greater than 4. –  Eric Green Dec 30 '12 at 20:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.