Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider a problem, in which I'm developing a tree like Collection.

One of the main functionality of my Collection is to trace all the stored items one by one and then call a given function for each item until a given criteria has been met (lazy Collection).

So the function should have the following signatures:

void Trace(function func, criteria crit)
{
    item i = firstItem();
    while (i != endItem())
    {
        i = nextItem();
        func(i);
        if (crit(i))
            return;
    }
}

in C++ function pointers can be used for func and crit.
in C#, yield keyword is exactly the solution to this problem, I believe.

How can I get the same thing in Java?

share|improve this question
1  
Your loop has s bug. It doesn't process the last element. Consider a list if length 1 - the while loop would not be entered. –  Bohemian Dec 28 '12 at 1:37
    
Good Point :) But fortunately, that has not much to do with the problem :) –  MBZ Dec 28 '12 at 1:41

4 Answers 4

Create an interface that declares the methods, and require a reference to an object implementing the interface as argument. The caller can create the object using an anonymous inner class.

share|improve this answer

In Java, you would pass references to objects of classes that implement applicable functions, or use Commons Collections instead:

  • Use Predicate implementations for the crit part.
  • Use Closure implementations for the func part.

For example:

Closure c = new Closure() {
    public void execute(Object obj) {
        ...
    }
};

Predicate p = new Predicate() {
    public boolean evaluate(Object obj) {
        ...
    }
}

Trace(c, p);
share|improve this answer
    
+1, and if you prefer to stick with core Java, Callable provides a reasonable generic interface for closure-like things that can return a value. –  Ryan Stewart Dec 28 '12 at 2:23
    
@RyanStewart, my problem with Callable is that it doesn't provide the API that the OP wanted. The call() method receives no parameters, which means that you'd have to create a new instance of your Callable implementation with each iteration. –  Isaac Dec 28 '12 at 9:43

What you're looking for here is the Strategy design pattern.

The goal of this pattern to to abstract the implementation of an algorithm into a Strategy object. Here, your algorithms are the func and crit functions that you're looking to pass in.

So, you'd have an interface called something like TraceStrategy. You'd then pass implementations of this interface in to your collection. Your code would then look something like

void Trace(TraceStrategy traceStrategy)
{
    item i = firstItem();
    while (i != endItem())
    {
        i = nextItem();
        traceStrategy.func(i);
        if (traceStrategy.crit(i))
            return;
    }
}

and

interface TraceStrategy {
   public boolean crit(item i);

   public void func(item i);
}

You'd probably want to make this generic, so that you weren't tied to item... but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem with this approach is that there will always be a coupling between crit and func. If you have x possibilities for crit and y possibilities for func, you might end up creating x*y implementations of TraceStrategy... therefore, parameterization is a slightly better approach IMO. –  Isaac Dec 28 '12 at 9:44
    
@Isaac, excellent point. You could create a TraceStrategyFactory that takes CritStrategy and FuncStrategy objects and returns a composite object composed of those two... but your point about coupling these two function is very apropos –  Dancrumb Dec 28 '12 at 21:11
    
Yes. I agree that a combination of strategy pattern & parameterization would be the best fit for the OP's needs overall. –  Isaac Dec 28 '12 at 21:19

You can make this trace function work just fine in Java by combining a couple of techniques:

  • Instead of "function pointers", your parameters func and crit should be object instances that implement a specific interface. You can then call a function in this interface on the object i. In effect, this is a Vistor Pattern with two different vistor parameters.
  • You also need some way to traverse the tree. You could implement an Iterator - this gives you a nice way to traverse the entire structure. Alternatively you could make trace recursive (it calls itself on left and right branches of the tree) and then you wouldn't need an iterator.

The iterator version would look something like this:

public void trace(IFunction func, ICriteria crit) {
    for (T i: this) {
        func.call(i);
        if (crit.test(i)) return;
    }
}

Here T is the item type of the collection, and call and test are the function definitions in the IFunction and ICriteria interfaces respectively.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.