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I am learning Ruby and am messing with reading/writing files right now. When I create the file, 'filename', I can write to it with the .write() method. However, I cannot output the content to the terminal without reopening it after running .read() on it (see line 8: puts write_txt.read()). I have tried running line 8 multiple times, but all that does is output more blank lines. Without line 8, puts txt.read() simply outputs a blank line. The following code also works without the puts in line 8 (simply write_txt.read())

# Unpacks first argument to 'filename'
filename = ARGV.first

# Lets write try writing to a file
write_txt = File.new(filename, 'w+')
write_txt.write("OMG I wrote this file!\nHow cool is that?")
# This outputs a blank line THIS IS THE LINE IN QUESTION
puts write_txt.read()

txt = File.open(filename)
# This actually outputs the text that I wrote
puts txt.read()

Why is this necessary? Why is the file that has clearly been written to being read as blank until it is reopened after being read as blank at least once?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you read or write to a file, there's an internal pointer called a "cursor" that keeps track of where in the file you currently are. When you write a file, the cursor is set to the point after the last byte you wrote, so that if you perform additional writes, they happen after your previous write (rather than on top of it). When you perform a read, you are reading from the current position to the end of the file, which contains...nothing!

You can open a file (cursor position 0), then write the string "Hello" (cursor position 6), and attempting to read from the cursor will cause Ruby to say "Oh hey, there's no more content in this file past cursor position 6", and will simply return a blank string.

You can rewind the file cursor with IO#rewind to reset the cursor to the beginning of the file. You may then read the file (which will read from the cursor to the end of the file) normally.

Note that if you perform any writes after rewinding, you will overwrite your previously-written content.

# Unpacks first argument to 'filename'
filename = ARGV.first

# Lets write try writing to a file
write_txt = File.new(filename, 'w+')
write_txt.write("OMG I wrote this file!\nHow cool is that?")

write_txt.rewind
puts write_txt.read()

Note, however, that it is generally considered bad practice to both read from and write to the same file handle. You would generally open one file handle for reading and one for writing, as mixing the two can have nasty consequenses (such as accidentally overwriting existing content by rewinding the cursor for a read, and then performing a write!)

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Wow thanks! After reading this I played with the code, and thought it might be useful to add one point/add one question. Both rewinding (as mentioned) and closing write_txt make it so Line 8 is not needed for the cursor to reset when the file is reopened with a new handle (not sure I am using that term right; I am referring to the txt assignment). The question: why does Line 8 reset the cursor for the new handle, but not for the original handle? Why does it reset the cursor at all? – mattmattmatt Dec 28 '12 at 4:36
    
You're opening a second file handle there, not resetting the first. When you open a new handle, it starts at the start of the file. Each file handle has a cursor, so you can have as many file handles open to a given file as you'd like, with their cursors in various positions independent of each other. – Chris Heald Dec 28 '12 at 4:53
    
If you run the code I originally had, without Line 8, the puts txt.read() outputs a blank line as if the cursor is at the end of the file. This is solved either by including line 8, or rewinding/closing write_txt. If the second file handle is starting at the beginning of the file, then why does this happen? Thanks for all your help, Chris, I am learning a lot! – mattmattmatt Dec 28 '12 at 5:53

The output is not necessarily written to the file immediately. Also, the pointer is at the end of the file, if you want to read while in read-write mode you have to reset it. You can simply close if you want to reopen it for reading. Try:

write_txt.write("OMG I wrote this file!\nHow cool is that?")
# This outputs a blank line THIS IS THE LINE IN QUESTION
write_txt.close
txt = File.open(filename)
puts txt.read()
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