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I have this regex: (?<![A-Z])(?<=[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z]) It splits a paragraph up into sentences (based on every whitespace).

I used it on this paragraph: Did he know that J. Smith is a name? The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are Often rooted in centuries old naval tradition. I.D. is a wonderful word.

It breaks on "J. Smith" because it thinks that the "." represents the end of a sentence.

I'm using re.split() and printing the array out, separating the values with newlines

This is the output from the above paragraph:

Did he know that J.
Smith is a name?
The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its
country's military forces. (no newline at beginning of sentence)
The ceremonies involved are Often rooted in centuries old naval tradition.
I.D. is a wonderful word.`

It works for "I.D." but why not for "J. Smith"? Logically, it should...

I want it to detect this structure in the string:

no capital letter+period/?/!+whitespace+capital letter

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1  
How could a regex differentiate Did he know that J. Smith is a name? from He knows more than I. Smith is a name. ? I don't think it is possible with only regex. –  unutbu Dec 28 '12 at 2:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A lookbehind (or lookahead) is a zero-width assertion — that is, it matches a zero-length string at any point where the assertion is true.

In particular, this means that, if you have two consecutive lookbehind (or lookahead) assertions in your regexp, they will only match if both of them match at the same point.

Thus, (?<![A-Z])(?<=[.!?]) matches if the previous character is not a capital letter in the range A-Z and if it is one of the characters .!?. Obviously, the latter assertion implies the former, so the (?<![A-Z]) part of your regexp has no actual effect.

It looks like what you want to assert is that the previous character is of .!? and that the one before it is not a capital letter. If so, one solution would be to replace (?<![A-Z]) with (?<![A-Z].).


Ps. The reason your original regex doesn't split up "I.D. is" is that there's no space after the first dot for the \s to match, and the space after the second period is not followed by a capital letter as required by your look-ahead assertion.

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I tried to do the same for "Dr." by using this regex: (?<=(?<![A-Z])(?<![a-z].)?(?=[.!?].))\s(?=[A-Z]) but it doesn't work. I think it is because I made (?<![a-z].) optional (using a ?) so it can not split "J. Smith" and "Dr. Muhammed" –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 28 '12 at 3:03
    
Yes, an optional lookbehind/ahead assertion is completely useless. Instead, you could use e.g. (?<![A-Z][a-z].)(?<![A-Z].)(?<=[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z]). (However, note that that will also fail to match after the valid sentence "No.", since it cannot distinguish it from "Dr.", so you may want to use a more specific assertion like, say, (?<!(Dr|Mr|Ms)\.).) –  Ilmari Karonen Dec 28 '12 at 3:12

Aside from @unutbu's point, it may not be doing what you expect because you're asserting both lookbehinds on the same character, i.e. you're saying, "The previous character is not [A-Z] and it is [.!?]." Maybe you mean to nest them, e.g.

(?<=(?<![A-Z])[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z])
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How would I nest two? I want to check for "Dr." but this doesn't work: (?<=(?<![A-Z])(?<=[a-z])?[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z]) –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 28 '12 at 2:35
    
and I made (?<=[a-z]) optional so it still (theoretically) should work for "J." as well as "Dr." –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 28 '12 at 2:38
    
Read @IlmariKorenen's answer. You are still misperceiving lookbehinds as having a width, when in fact they have none. For example, you would mean (?<=(?<![A-Z][a-z])?[.!?])\s(?=[A-Z]). However this doesn't work, for a separate reason: lookbehind assertions can only have a fixed total width, and the optionality within violates that; furthermore, quantifying a lookaround assertion, I read somewhere, is undefined behavior. –  Andrew Cheong Dec 28 '12 at 2:42
    
never mind, there is a problem in my logic –  JOHANNES_NYÅTT Dec 28 '12 at 2:43
    
In Java, if you apply a + quantifier to a lookaround it effectively ignores the quantifier; if the lookaround succeeds once, it won't try again because that would result in an infinite loop: making the same assertion at the same spot ad infinitum. If you apply ? or * to a lookaround, it effectively ignores the lookaround; again, the lookaround is only applied once, but now you don't even care if it succeeds. So the behavior is defined, but pointless. Most other flavors treat it as a syntax error, which I think is much more helpful. –  Alan Moore Dec 28 '12 at 3:23

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