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I have a loop which needs to be run 200 million times in a browser. It's a simulator which several people need to use regularly. It takes about 15 minutes to run, but during this time, the browsers will frequently pop up a warning with "this script is taking too long" etc., and it completely hangs Firefox during the function. This also means the page does not update my status indicator (which is just a number).

I have googled "javascript yield" and read the first 4 pages of hits. Some discuss a new "yield" keyword, but there is only one description and example, which I find incomprehensible, e.g. "The function containing the yield keyword is a generator. When you call it, it's formal parameters are bound to actual arguments, but it's body isn't actually evaluated". Does yield yield to the UI?

One of the few solutions I did find is this old post which uses the deprecated callee argument and a timer to call itself: http://www.julienlecomte.net/blog/2007/10/28/

However, the above example doesn't contain any loop variables or state, and when I add these it falls apart, and my net result is always zero.

It also doesn't do chunking, but I have found some other examples which chunk using "index % 100 == 0" on every iteration. However, this seems to be a slow way of doing it. E.g. this:

How to stop intense Javascript loop from freezing the browser

But it doesn't have any way to update progress, and doesn't yield to the UI (so still hangs the browser). Here is a test version which hangs the browser during execution:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script>
var spins = 1000000
var chunkSize = 1000;
var chunk;
function Stats() {this.a=0};
var stats = new Stats();               
var big;

var index = 0;

var process = function() {
  for (; index < spins; index++) {
    stats.a++;
    big = (big/3.6)+ big * 1.3 * big / 2.1;
    console.write(big);
    // Perform xml processing
    if (index + 1 < spins && index % 100 == 0) {
        document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
        setTimeout(process, 5);
    }
  }
  document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
};


</script>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body  onload="process()">
<div id=result>result goes here.</div>
</body>
</html>

and here is another attempt which the stats.a is always zero (So I presume there is some scoping issue):

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script>
var spins = 1000000
var chunkSize = 1000;
var chunk;
function Stats() {this.a=0};
var stats = new Stats();               

function doIt() {
    function spin() {
       for (spinIx=0; (spinIx<chunkSize) && (spinIx+chunk < spins); spinIx++) {
           stats.a++;
       }
    }        

    for (chunk =0; chunk < spins; chunk+=chunkSize){
        setTimeout(spin, 5);
            document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
        }
      document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
}

</script>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body  onload="doIt()">
<div id=result>result goes here.</div>
</body>
</html>

I've spent 48 hours trying to get this working - either I am very dumb or this is very hard. Any ideas?

Several people have suggested web workers. I tried several days to get his working, but I could not find a similar example which passes a number etc. The code below was my last attempt to get it working, but the result is always 0 when it should be 100000. I.e. it fails in the same way that my second example above fails.

spinMaster.html:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
</head>
<body>
<script>
if(typeof(Worker)==="undefined") {
  document.write("<h1>sorry, your browser doesnt support web workers, please use firefox, opera, chorme or safari</h1>");
  } 
var worker =new Worker("spinWorker.js");

worker.postMessage({times:1000000});

worker.onmessage=function(event){
document.getElementById("result").innerHTML=event.data;
}; 
</script>

<div id="result">result goes here</div>
</body>
</html>

spinWorker.js

function State() {
    this.a=0;
}

var state = new State();

self.addEventListener('message', spin, false);

function spin(e) {
    var times, i;

    times = e.data.times;
//times = 1000000; // this doesnt work either.

    for(i;i<times;i++) {
        state.a++;
    }

    self.postMessage(state.a);
}

resultant output: 0

share|improve this question
4  
since JS is single threaded usually, I don't think there is any way around it. If you are supporting only newer browsers however, you might want to look into web workers, which can spawn a new thread to do work: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/Using_web_workers –  kennypu Dec 28 '12 at 2:32
    
@kennypu You should post that as an answer. –  Sergiu Dumitriu Dec 28 '12 at 2:33
1  
Your performance problem could very well be the constant DOM manipulation (every 5ms), which is VERY expensive. Try updating the DOM at a different rate, say every 10-20 seconds and see if that makes it perform better/faster. –  elclanrs Dec 28 '12 at 2:35
    
You could run the code for a number of iterations, create a timer, when the timer is hit the code continues from where it left off, and then so on. –  Lee Taylor Dec 28 '12 at 2:41

5 Answers 5

Web workers sound like the better solution.

I wrote this up quickly so i dunno if itll work. Performance will be very bad...

Edit: Changed to same format as poster. Tested

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script>
    var spins = 1000000
    var chunkSize = 1000;
    var chunk;
    function Stats() {this.a=0};
    var stats = new Stats();        
    var big = 0.0;

    var index = 0;

    function workLoop() {

        index += 1;

        stats.a++;
        big = (big/3.6)+ big * 1.3 * big / 2.1;
        console.log(big);
        // Perform xml processing
        document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = stats.a;
        if (index < spins) {
            setTimeout(workLoop, 5); 
        }   

    }   



</script>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body onload="workLoop()">
<div id="result">result goes here.</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Hi rissicay, could you explain what the "if (index) part is for? My understanding you are saying "if (index==0) indext=1;" which is the same as saying "index +=1;" –  John Little Dec 28 '12 at 23:39
    
yea you're right. Made an edit. –  rissicay Dec 28 '12 at 23:47

since JS is single threaded usually, I don't think there is any way around it. If you are supporting only newer browsers however, you might want to look into web workers, which can spawn a new thread to do work: http://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/Using_web_workers

the only downside I can think of is that I've read it is hard to debug Web Workers because dev tools (Chrome Dev tools unless running dev channel, firebug), doesn't support profiling for it.

here's a nice tutorial to get you started: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/javascript-ajax/getting-started-with-web-workers/

share|improve this answer

You have close to a working example in your 1st test, but I do see a logic error. In your if(), you need to return from the function otherwise it'll always be running multiple functions competing for that thread.

var process = function() {
  for (; index < spins; index++) {
    stats.a++;
    big = (big/3.6)+ big * 1.3 * big / 2.1;
    console.write(big);
    // Perform xml processing
    if (index + 1 < spins && index % 100 == 0) {

document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
        setTimeout(process, 5);
        //!!!!!
        return;//without this it'll keep iterating through the for loop without waiting for the next 5ms
        //!!!!!
    }
  }

document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
};

Neither of the samples as-is wait for the next setTimeout (in your 2nd Example you continue iterating through your for loop until the for loop is completed, but at each block size you set a timeout for a subsequent iteration. All this does is delay the entire sequence for 5 ms, they still all pileup and execute 5 ms from when your for loop begins iterating)

All in all you seem to be on the right track, there are just small logic errors in both examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this was helpful, although I don't really understand what is going on. I added this return, then it output each number (e.g. 1,2,3) instead of 100,200 etc. I added && (index>0) to the if, and an extra index++ before the return, and now it seems to work. The strange thing is that I copied this example verbatim from one of the few published examples on how to do this. I guess they published non working code. –  John Little Dec 28 '12 at 23:57
    
ya, good point, since you are starting at multiples of 100, the index > 0 is needed for the 1st iteration to succeed (as 0 % 100 == 0). There are examples that are copy/paste ready and those that are pointers, maybe the one you used was aimed towards being a pointer. But it's a common mistake for things like recursive functions and as it were in JavaScript, the deferred for loops that rely on global variables like "index". Oh well. So are you where you need to be now? Is your app working as you hoped? –  chwagssd Dec 29 '12 at 9:45

There is a library on github available for this type of big looping without locking the browser/thread and without using web-workers.

Somewhat experimental, and supports big recursive loops, but it may work for you. Depends on q.js for resolving promises.

https://github.com/sterpe/stackless.js

share|improve this answer

This should do what you want:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script>
var spins = 1000000
var chunkSize = 1000;
var stats = {a:0,spins:0};              

function doIt() {
    for (var chunk = 0; chunk < chunkSize; chunk++) {
        stats.a++;
    }
    document.getElementById("result").innerHTML = stats.a;
    if(++stats.spins < spins) setTimeout(doIt,5);

}

</script>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body  onload="doIt()">
<div id=result>result goes here.</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

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