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There is a very easy trick which creates a dictionary-like structure where keys are types. The structure acts like a Dictionary<Type, T?> where keys are Type objects and values are instances of the corresponding types.

This wonderful structure is as fast as just a variable or array since the "lookup" is only done once by the compiler/JITter and the proper value reference is compiled into your program.

    public static class MyDict<T> {
        public static T Value { get; set; }
    }

You can work with that structure like this:

MyDict<string>.Value = MyDict<int>.Value.ToString();

The problem is that this "dictionary" is global. The only way to create different dictionaries is to create different classes.

How can create a similar (fastest "lookup", no boxing) non-static structure? (Without code generation.)

Simply said: I want to have multiple Dictionary<Type, object>-like objects without lookup costs, casting and boxing.

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1  
Remove the static keywords? –  Khan Dec 28 '12 at 2:47
1  
I don't get it? What is the purpose of a class that stores a single value? Why not just use a simple variable... –  andleer Dec 28 '12 at 2:48
    
I want a Dictionary<Type, T?> where keys are Type objects and values are instances of the corresponding types. –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 2:51
    
@JefferyKhan Then it would stop working. Each instance would be separate, so it would stop acting like a dictionary. Your suggestion is equivalent to replacing a dictionary with a (bunch of) single-value variables. –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 2:55
    
What you are probably looking for is Dictionary<Type, List<T>> but in a language in C# you can use a generic argument to do this because T must be known at compile time. You can do something like Dictionary<Type, List<object>> but that would require you to always down cast which in theory is not "type-safe". –  Ameen Dec 28 '12 at 2:57
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ark-kun is using generics to essentially generate unique types at compile time. With a generic type, any static members are unique to that specific closed generic type. This way it's processed as fast as a standard static member lookup.

The above usage is equivalent to something like this:

public static class MyDict_String 
{
    public static string Value { get; set; }
}

public static class MyDict_Int32
{
    public static int Value { get; set; }
}

MyDict_String.Value = MyDict_Int32.Value.ToString();

AFAIK, types are "static" (in that you can't define more than one that way) so I don't know of a way to cheat around this and maintain the same performance of a statically compiled member lookup.

Your best bet otherwise (I think) is to create a generic instance type that wraps its own dictionary that uses System.Type for its keys and System.Object for its values to which you have to perform boxing/casting when inserting/retrieving values.

EDIT: Here's a simple implementation wrapping a dictionary:

public class MyTypedDict
{
    private Dictionary<Type, object> Values = new Dictionary<Type, object>();

    public T Get<T>()
    {
        object untypedValue;
        if (Values.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out untypedValue))
            return (T)untypedValue;
        return default(T);
    }

    public void Set<T>(T value)
    {
        Values[typeof(T)] = value;
    }
}

Thinking about it more, it might be possible to achieve a more property-like syntax using an ExpandoObject (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.dynamic.expandoobject.aspx) through some tomfoolery, but I feel like this would be pretty abusive and I can only assume terribly prone to runtime errors. (plus it would afford you nothing at compile time)

EDITx2: If you really want to have different sets of values, you could nest it within another generic type:

public static class ValueSets<T>
{
    public static class MyDict<U>
    {
        public static U Value { get; set; }
    }
}

With usage like:

ValueSets<int>.MyDict<string>.Value = "Hello ";
ValueSets<bool>.MyDict<string>.Value = "World!";

string helloworld = ValueSets<int>.MyDict<string>.Value + ValueSets<bool>.MyDict<string>.Value;
Console.WriteLine(helloworld);//Hello World!

But then the initial type int and bool in this case become "magical" and without meaning, plus you would need to provide a unique type per distinct set of values you'd like to use. Plus you could not pass it around and modify as an instance variable, rather it'd be statically accessible (so long as you have access to use the type T). So perhaps you could declare minimally visible types that are named with meaning and use those:

internal class MyFirstWords {}
internal class MySecondWords {}

ValueSets<MyFirstWords>.MyDict<string>.Value = "Hello ";
ValueSets<MySecondWords>.MyDict<string>.Value = "World!";

string helloworld = ValueSets<MyFirstWords>.MyDict<string>.Value + ValueSets<MySecondWords>.MyDict<string>.Value;
Console.WriteLine(helloworld);//Hello World!

Regardless, I think this is quite wacky and I wouldn't recommend it.

share|improve this answer
    
EDITx2 is a very interesting solution. Since type-indexing is lookup-free, the double-indexing which I want can be accomplished with double type-indexing. (Although it's not very practical because of inability to create new types in runtime. Types can be created using reflection though...). –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 4:03
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The usage case you are describing fits quite closely with the purpose for which ConditionalWeakTable<TKey,TValue> was added to .NET 4.0. For the purpose you describe, you would include such a table in a static generic class, and then for every class object that's supposed to contain a reference to an item of a particular type you would store into that type's table a reference to object that's supposed to contain the item along with either a reference to the item, or else a reference to a simple item-holder object (note that entries in ConditionalWeakTable will evaporate when an object ceases to exist, but are otherwise immutable, so if you want a mutable association you'll need to create an object to hold it).

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Thanks for the answer. I know about the ConditionalWeakTable and even DependentHandl, but I don't think it's relevant to my question. There are two types of bindings - compile-time and runtime. Accessing a variable can be thought as a type of binding. There is a difference between a = 1 (compile-time) and dict["a"] = 1(runtime indexing). The "dictionary" in my example is completely compile-time bound. MyDict<int>.Value = 1 is the same as int MyDict_int_Value = 1. –  Ark-kun Dec 13 '13 at 7:14
    
MyDict<int>.Value = 1 would effectively execute as MyDictionaryHelper<int>.theTable.GetValue(MyDict, (x)=> new int[0])[0] = 1, assuming internal static class MyDictionaryHelper<T> { internal ConditionalWeakTable<MyDictType,T[]> theTable;}. Semantically, the code would behave as though the items were stored in MyDict, and everything about the code would be fully type-safe [if desired, one could define an value holder class instead of using an array]. What more do you want? –  supercat Dec 13 '13 at 17:04
    
Semantically the code using any dictionary type is the same. Like the second code block from stackoverflow.com/a/14064051/1497385 - a simple structure based on Dictionary<Type, object>. I don't see the difference here. The difference between MyDict Dictionary/ConditionalWeakTable is the ultra-fast compile-time indexing (no indexing at all). –  Ark-kun Dec 13 '13 at 20:01
    
@Ark-kun: The code using ConditionalWeakTable is fully type-safe, while a Dictionary<Type, Object> is not. What you are seeking fundamentally is to retrieve something based upon a combination of an object reference and type, so neither the fast ways to retrieve a static object of a generic type, nor the fast ways to retrieve a known individual field of an object, are going to be applicable. It would be possible to have internal static class Fetchers<TDummy> { public class Holders<T> { static T Value; } public static T GetValue<TValue>() {return Holders<T>.Value;} }, and... –  supercat Dec 13 '13 at 20:15
    
@Ark-kun: ...have every instance of MyDict create a different dummy type which could be used for the lookup [the code above isn't quite right], which would in theory eliminate the need for run-time indexing. In practice, torturing the type system in such fashion would almost certainly make things slower rather than faster. The .NET type system can handle the run-time creation of thousands of types, but will get more and more bogged down as the number of types increases. –  supercat Dec 13 '13 at 20:23
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What you are looking for is impossible in C#. The language does not support a container that could store multiple objects of different types yet provides a look up method that does not involve casting, boxing or unboxing. You could accomplish something like this with macros in C++, or via a language like javascript where the structure of types can be changed at run-time.

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If you look at the answers, you'll see that there are couple of such containers mentioned. There is the original static "dictionary" (we can create multiple "instances" of it) stackoverflow.com/q/14063940/1497385. There is also a "double-type-indexed" "dictionary" stackoverflow.com/a/14064051/1497385. These ones don't have any lookup. There is a container with the "array-indexing" lookup stackoverflow.com/a/14064329/1497385. Lastly, there is a beautiful dictionary-based solution that doesn't have casting or boxing: stackoverflow.com/a/14064463/1497385. –  Ark-kun Jan 3 '13 at 22:14
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Here's an approach that extends the method described in the question:

public class TypeDict
{
    public T Get<T>()
    {
        return MyDict<T>.Values[this];
    }
    public void Set<T>(T value)
    {
        MyDict<T>.Values[this] = value;
    }
    private static class MyDict<T>
    {
        public static Dictionary<TypeDict, T> Values { get; private set; }

        static MyDict()
        {
            Values = new Dictionary<TypeDict, T>();
        }
    }
}

Now we can use the TypeDict like this:

void X()
{
    var a = new TypeDict();
    var b = new TypeDict();

    a.Set<int>(1);
    a.Set<double>(3.14);
    a.Set("Hello, world!");

    //Note that type inference allows us to omit the type argument
    b.Set(10);          
    b.Set(31.4);  
    b.Set("Hello, world, times ten!");

    Console.WriteLine(a.Get<int>());
    Console.WriteLine(a.Get<double>());
    Console.WriteLine(a.Get<string>());

    Console.WriteLine();
    Console.WriteLine(b.Get<int>());
    Console.WriteLine(b.Get<double>());
    Console.WriteLine(b.Get<string>());
}
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It still has the dictionary lookup (another problem with such approaches (my answer included) is GC prevention). But the solution is very beautiful! I like the simplicity, the static type-indexing, the lack of casts and boxing and the [this] indexing. –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 4:35
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@Konstantin's answer made me remember that there is actually a very fast lookup method - array indexing. This crude PoC code shows a variant of the required structure.

    public class TypeDictionary {
        static int _maxId = 0;
        int _id;

        static class Store<T>{
            internal static List<T> Values = new List<T>();
        }

        public TypeDictionary() {
            _id = _maxId++;
        }

        public T GetValue<T>() {
            return Store<T>.Values[_id];
        }

        public void SetValue<T>(T value) {
            while(Store<T>.Values.Count < _id) {
                Store<T>.Values.Add(default(T));
            }
            Store<T>.Values[_id] = value;
        } 
    }

This code can be used as follows:

        var dict1 = new TypeDictionary();
        dict1.SetValue("my string");
        string result = dict1.GetValue<string>();

The problem with this solution is it's memory usage caused by the repository being not sparse. This also makes first time value setting more expensive.

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So you've swapped a Dictionary lookup with a List index lookup? How much performance do you need to squeeze out of this? Also mind you that by storing these values statically, the garbage collector will never collect them even once a particular instance of TypeDictionary is no longer referenced and removed from memory (perhaps a destructor can help with this) –  Chris Sinclair Dec 28 '12 at 4:01
    
Yes, I've replaced hash/Equals lookup with indexing. Array element is a closest thing to a variable. Thanks for the memory leak warning, didn't think about this problem (even though I spend this year preventing memory leaks in .Net (caused by events)). It's not that I'll actually use such code anywhere. The techniques, on the other hand, are valuable and I've learned something new. I've surveyed the possible solutions and analyzed the problems. My code will probably either stay with the static variant or use the Dictionary<Type, object>. –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 4:25
    
@ChrisSinclair "How much performance do you need to squeeze out of this?" I need this for a performance-critical part of the system: the operator repository. I need to store and lookup the arithmetic operation handlers for different type combinations. public static MyMonad<T> operator +(MyMonad<T> a, MyMonad<T> b) { return new MyMonad<T>(Operators.Addition<T, T, T>.Handler(a, b)); } –  Ark-kun Dec 31 '12 at 1:39
    
If one wants to use array indexing and doesn't mind casting to/from Object, I think it might be better for each object to hold an Object[], and have the array index be a sequence number associated with the type [i.e. the first time an attempt is made to use a particular type, atomically read and increment the number of types used so far, store that value somewhere associated with the type]. Code which tried to access the information associated with a particular type would have to check the array size and might have to expand the array, but could otherwise be a direct array access. –  supercat Dec 16 '13 at 0:15
    
" and have the array index be a sequence number associated with the type" Then we'd have a way to map Type to int. And the only way I know is a Dictionary<Type, int>. –  Ark-kun Dec 16 '13 at 17:16
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A more complicated version. Don't know if it's closer:

Define a generic dictionary:

public class MyDictionary<T>
{
    Dictionary<string, T> dict;

    public MyDictionary()
    {
        dict = new Dictionary<string, T>();
    }

    public T this[string name]
    {
        get
        {
            if (dict.ContainsKey(name))
                return dict[name];
            else
                return default(T);//or throw
        }
        set
        {
            dict[name] = value;
        }
    }
}

Then a repository to store those dictionaries:

public class MyRepository
{
    List<object> repo;

    public MyRepository()
    {
        repo = new List<object>();
    }

    public void Add<T>(string name, T value)
    {
        if (!repo.OfType<MyDictionary<T>>().Any())
            repo.Add(new MyDictionary<T>());
        var dict = repo.OfType<MyDictionary<T>>().FirstOrDefault();
        dict[name] = value;
    }

    public T GetValue<T>(string name)
    {
        if (!repo.OfType<MyDictionary<T>>().Any())
            return default(T);//or throw
        else
        {
            var dict = repo.OfType<MyDictionary<T>>().FirstOrDefault();
            return dict[name];
        }
    }
}

And finally you may use this repository:

        MyRepository repo = new MyRepository();
        repo.Add("A", 1);
        repo.Add("B", 1);
        int i = repo.GetValue<int>("A") + repo.GetValue<int>("B");

In this example, there is MyDictionary<T> boxing to object is left.

From the other side, if your are working with some certain types you may not use thie repository class at all. But utilize separate dictionaties.

MyDictionary<int> intDict = new MyDictionary<int>();
intDict["A"] = 1;
intDict["B"] = 2;
int i = intDict["A"] + intDict["B"];

However it's the same as working with

Dictionary<string, int> intDict = new Dictionary<string, int>();

So the MyRepository class may be edited to use Dictionary<string, T> instead of MyDictionary<T>.

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Very close, but there is still a lookup. But your solution has hit me upon an idea. Maybe this is really solvable! –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 3:27
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Try this:

public class MyDictionary
{
    List<object> values;

    public MyDictionary()
    {
        values = new List<object>();
    }

    public T GetValue<T>()
    {
        return values.OfType<T>().FirstOrDefault();
    }

    public bool Add<T>(T value)
    {
        if (values.OfType<T>().Any())
            return false;
        else
        {
            values.Add(value);
            return true;
        }
    }
}

and use it:

var md = new MyDictionary();
md.Add("!!!");
string s = md.GetValue<string>();

This class may store up to one value of type T. But there could corner cases with derived classes and interfaces I guess. You may check, if it suits your need, and probably modify it as you need, if it's close to what you need in general.

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Well, I think it would be better implemented as Dictionary<Type, object> mentioned in the question. But it has the problems mentioned in the question: lookup and boxing (the casting is fixed). –  Ark-kun Dec 28 '12 at 3:11
    
@Ark-kun This still has casting from the OfType<T>. This is also not a Dictionary lookup: it will be up to O(n) where n is the number of types stored. It will also have issues with inheritance in the Add method. –  Chris Sinclair Dec 28 '12 at 3:27
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