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I have the following form (below) which has a hidden input tag. On form submission and response back I want to change the name of that hidden inputs name to have a value of "__REMOVE__". Then on submission of the response of the form again I want it to go back to "__ADD__", and so on. The code however is not working for me, the name="__ADD__" never changes on the form. I'm very new to jQuery so please excuse my ignorance. Note, the value of __BRONZE__ should never change - it is a requirement of the backend PHP that the name changes.

Form:

<form action="cart.php" method="post" class="cart-ajax">
    <input type="hidden" name="__ADD__" value="__BRONZE__" />
    <br><button type="submit" class="add-more-top dark cart-button-eight">Add to Cart</button>
    <div class="cart-ajax-response"></div>
</form>

jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {

// code here snipped out to keep this question short

    // Shopping Cart Form
    $("form.cart-ajax").submit(function(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            var form = $(this);

            // update the submit buttons text on form submission
            if(form.find('input:hidden').attr('name', '__ADD__'))
            {
                    form.find('button:submit').html('Adding...');
            }
            else if(form.find('input:hidden').attr('name', '__REMOVE__'))
            {
                    form.find('button:submit').html('Removing...');
            }

            $.post(form.attr('action'), form.serialize(),
                    function(data) {

                            // update the submit buttons text after successful response 
                            // update the hidden form field with the opposite of the current value
                            if(form.find('input:hidden').attr('name') == '__ADD__')
                            {
                                    form.find('button:submit').html('Remove');
                                    form.find('input:hidden').attr('name', '__REMOVE__');
                            }
                            else if(form.find('input:hidden').attr('name') == '__REMOVE__')
                            {
                                    form.find('button:submit').html('Add');
                                    form.find('input:hidden').attr('name', '__ADD__');
                            }

                            // do something with the returned data - used in cart-ajax-response div
                            form.find('.cart-ajax-response').empty().html(data.aResults[0]);

                    }, 'json');
    });
}); // <-- document ready
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
if(form.find('input:hidden').attr('name', '__ADD__'))

isn't doing what you think. You're actually setting that field's name not asking if it exists.

Use

if(form.find('input[name="__ADD__"]').length)

and note .length gets you an integer. Without it you'll be returned an object, which is true even if its length is 0.

However, take a look at this http://jsfiddle.net/3xTfX/2/ - same thing, less code

share|improve this answer
    
or just use: if(form.find('input:hidden').attr('name')=='WHATEVER'){...} – Josep Dec 28 '12 at 3:25
    
form.find('input:hidden').attr('name') returns the name of the first element it matches. It'll work in the example given but another hidden field may be added in that form and could just happen to be before the one we need to check. Things can change so I wouldn't advise relying on something easily breakable. – Popnoodles Dec 28 '12 at 3:28
1  
Agree, I was just trying to point out that he can actually use the jQuery "attr" function to check if an attribute has certain value, nothing else. I like your answer and your approach, but I just thought that it would be good for CocoaNoob to know that. – Josep Dec 28 '12 at 3:31
    
Fair enough but always helpful to point out how a method could be affected by changes made elsewhere if there's a chance it could break. – Popnoodles Dec 28 '12 at 3:33
1  
Actually a class, because OP has used a class on the form and then form.find() it suggests there's more than the one form on the page. This also means using ('name')=='__ADD__ like Josep suggested too. – Popnoodles Dec 28 '12 at 4:01

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