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I'm slightly confused. Everywhere I've read, suggest that when using ARC, you still need to release core foundation objects which makes sense, ARC doesn't manage them. However, I've got a method which uses some CF methods/objects which I used CFRelease on, but that then caused the app to crash. Uncommenting my CFReleases fixes the issue but then I'm assuming I've got a memory leak?

Could someone please explain which things need releasing and which don't, or anything else that's wrong with this code?

+ (NSString *) fileExtensionForMimeType:(NSString *)type
{
    CFStringRef mimeType = (__bridge CFStringRef)type;
    CFStringRef uti = UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassMIMEType, mimeType, NULL);
    CFStringRef extension = UTTypeCopyPreferredTagWithClass(uti, kUTTagClassFilenameExtension);

    NSString *ext = (__bridge NSString *)extension;

    // CFRelease(mimeType);
    // CFRelease(uti);
    // CFRelease(extension);

    return ext;
}

The three commented out CFRelease calls fix the issue as mentioned, but I know it's wrong. What should I be doing?

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what's wrong with the 3 commented commands. Just uncomment it is fine –  Raptor Dec 28 '12 at 3:50
1  
When I uncomment them, my app crashes with a EXC_BAD_ACCESS exception. Doing a trace in instruments points to this method and commenting those lines fixes it –  PaReeOhNos Dec 28 '12 at 3:52
2  
You should only release uti & extension, but not mimeType because you are not increasing the reference count of mimeType. you are simply type casting it. Uncomment last to CFRelease and then let me know what happens –  Evol Gate Dec 28 '12 at 4:00
    
Spot on Evol, thanks! –  PaReeOhNos Dec 28 '12 at 4:04
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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You can't release mimeType because you don't own it. You didn't transfer ownership with the __bridge cast.

You should be releasing uti since you have created it.

You should also release extension since you created it as well, but that will likely cause issues with ext. Instead, transfer ownership to ext.

I'd suggest the following:

+ (NSString *) fileExtensionForMimeType:(NSString *)type {
    CFStringRef mimeType = (__bridge CFStringRef)type;
    CFStringRef uti = UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassMIMEType, mimeType, NULL);
    CFStringRef extension = UTTypeCopyPreferredTagWithClass(uti, kUTTagClassFilenameExtension);

    NSString *ext = (__bridge_transfer NSString *)extension;

    // CFRelease(mimeType); // not owned
    if (uti) CFRelease(uti);
    // CFRelease(extension); // ownership was transferred

    return ext;
}
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Great, simple explanation thanks! Works a charm :) –  PaReeOhNos Dec 28 '12 at 4:04
3  
+1 At WWDC 2012, Apple suggested CFBridgingRelease rather than __bridge_transfer. Also, are you entirely sure you need CFRelease(extension) because you've transferred ownership to ARC in the __bridge_transfer to ext. –  Rob Dec 28 '12 at 4:25
    
I thought CFBridgingRelease was the same as __bridge_transfer. The docs don't indicate there is any difference. Regardless, I think you are right about not releasing extension due to the transfer. I'll update my answer. Thanks. –  rmaddy Dec 28 '12 at 4:30
3  
It is the same, under the covers, but the functional interface is a hell of lot clearer as to intention and action [at least, most of us it consider it that way]. –  bbum Dec 28 '12 at 4:33
2  
@Rob Personally I think __bringing_transfer is clearer than CFBridgingRelease. The latter doesn't seem to indicate any transfer of ownership - but that's just my own opinion. –  rmaddy Dec 28 '12 at 4:39
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Check out WWDC 2012 - Modern Objective-C which outlines new guidelines for Core Foundation objects and ARC. It's about 37:35 into that video. In short, Core Foundation functions with Copy or Create in the name create an object that has transferred ownership to your app, and your app is responsible for releasing it.

Anyway, if ownership has been transferred via a Core Foundation method with Copy or Create in the name, you can either release manually it with CFRelease when you're done with it, or, easier, you can transfer ownership to ARC and let it take care of it. Historically, to transfer ownership to ARC, we used __bridge_transfer, but they now recommend CFBridgingRelease (though the latter is just a macro for the former). And, obviously, if you have some Core Foundation object that you retrieved via some other mechanism other than a function with Copy or Create in the name, you should neither CFRelease it nor transfer ownership to ARC.

By way of illustration, this method accomplishes what you want:

+ (NSString *) fileExtensionForMimeType:(NSString *)type {

    NSString *uti = CFBridgingRelease(UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassMIMEType,
                                                                            (__bridge CFStringRef)type,
                                                                            NULL));

    return CFBridgingRelease(UTTypeCopyPreferredTagWithClass((__bridge CFStringRef)uti,
                                                             kUTTagClassFilenameExtension));
}
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Thanks for the link. Will take a look through that at some point. Very nice and small solution, cheers :) –  PaReeOhNos Dec 28 '12 at 4:32
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In generally speaking, I think you should try to comment the first CFRelease(mimeType) line, and uncomment the followed two lines: CFRelease(uti) and CFRelease(extension). You cast a toll-free bridge to input NSString and ARC will handle the release. But the uti and extension is created/copied as CFString. ARC will not know how to handle them (remember ARC is a compiler feature for NSObject), so you need to CF release them.

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1  
And as @rmaddy said, add a __bridge_transfer on extension to transfer the retain count affair from CF to NSObject. –  onevcat Dec 28 '12 at 4:07
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