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I have a css problem. Im trying to vertically center the text in a div, which is overlaying another div, but the text won't budge.

EDIT: Here's teh JSFiddle url: http://jsfiddle.net/wgSEw/3/

The html is as follows:

<div id="footer-top">
            <div id="footer-top-left">
                <div id="footer-logo">
            </div>
            </div>
            <div id="footer-top-transition"></div>

        <div id="footer-top-right"></div>
        <div id="footer-top-bullets">
            <div id="site-map" class="footer-bullet">
                <img src="<?php echo BASE_IMG_URL . 'bulletlight.png'; ?>" alt="some_text">
                <span class="footer-bullet-text">Site Map</span>
            </div>
            <div id="report-issue" class="footer-bullet">
                <img src=<?php echo BASE_IMG_URL . 'bulletlight.png'; ?> alt="some_text">
                <span class="footer-bullet-text">Report an Issue</span>
            </div>
            <div id="submit-professor" class="footer-bullet">
                <img src=<?php echo BASE_IMG_URL . 'bulletblack.png'; ?> alt="some_text">
                <span class="footer-bullet-text">Submit Professor</span>
            </div>
            <div id="submit-school" class="footer-bullet">
                <img src=<?php echo BASE_IMG_URL . 'bulletblack.png'; ?> alt="some_text">
                <span class="footer-bullet-text">Submit a School</span>
            </div> 
        </div>
</div>

and the current css is:

#footer-top{
    position: relative;
    width: 960px;
    height: 63px;
    float: left;
    background-image:url('midtilefooter.png');
}

#footer-top-left{
    width: 466px;
    height: 63px;
    float: left;
}

#footer-logo{
    width: 265px;
    height: 63px;
    float: left;
    background-image:url('leftlogo.png');
}

#footer-top-transition{
    width: 27px;
    height: 63px;
    float: left;
    background-image: url('midblacktransition.png');
}

#footer-top-right{
    width: 467px;
    height: 63px;
    float: left;
    background-color: black;
}

#footer-top-bullets{
    position: absolute;
    float: left;
    width: 960px;
    height: 63px; 
    margin-left: 265px;
}

.footer-bullet{
    float: left;
    height: 63px;
    width: 173px;
    color: white;
}

.footer-bullet-text{
    height: 63px;
    color: white;
    top: 50%;
    margin-top: -31px;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

This essentially, creates a basic background for the top part of the footer, then overlays a div of bullets onto that background, so that it overlays without obscuring or messing with the background. The bullets are displaying in the correct places and, the text is correctly placed horizontally, but I can't get it to center vertically at all. Any help would be appreciated, as well as any general advice on css, Im pretty new to it, and it's giving me a run for my money. Thansk a lot!

share|improve this question
    
can you please create jsfiddle.net –  Miqdad Ali Dec 28 '12 at 3:51
    
it's really hard to imagine how it looks like:| –  Vainglory07 Dec 28 '12 at 3:57
    
I'm not that good in php but i think this part in your code is not good <?php echo BASE_IMG_URL . 'bulletlight.png'; ?> –  Ivo Jonkers Dec 28 '12 at 3:58
    
stackoverflow.com/a/13786100/1055987 –  JFK Dec 28 '12 at 4:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

to center a div vertical

html

 <div id="parent">
        <div id="child">Content here</div>
    </div>

css option 1

#parent {position: relative;}

#child {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    height: 30%;
    width: 50%;
    margin: -15% 0 0 -25%;
}

We begin by positioning both parent and child divs. Next we set the top and left values of the child to be 50% each, which would be the center of the parent. However this sets the top left corner to be in the center so we’re not done.

We need to move the child up (by half its height) and to the left (by half its width) so it’s center is what sits in the center of the parent element. This is why we need to know the height (and here the width) of the child element.

To do that we give the element a negative top and left margin equal to half its height and width.

Unlike the first 2 methods this one is meant for block level elements. It does work in all browsers, however the content can outgrow its container in which case it will disappear visually. It’ll work best when you know the heights and widths of the elements.

css option 2

#parent {position: relative;}

#child {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    width: 50%;
    height: 30%;
    margin: auto;
}

The idea with this method is to try to get the child element to stretch to all 4 edges by setting the top, bottom, right, and left vales to 0. Because our child element is smaller than our parent elements it can’t reach all 4 edges.

Setting auto as the margin on all 4 sides however causes opposite margins to be equal and displays our child div in the center of the parent div.

Unfortunately the above won’t work in IE7 and below and like the previous method the content inside the child div can grow too large causing it to be hidden.

css option 3

#parent {
    padding: 5% 0;
}

#child {
    padding: 10% 0;
}

In the css above I’ve set top and bottom paddings on both elements. Setting it on the child will make sure the contents in the child will be vertically centered and setting it on the parent ensures the entire child is centered within the parent.

I’m using relative measurements to allow each div to grow dynamically. If one of the elements or it’s content needs to be set with an absolute measurement then you’ll need to do some math to make sure things add up.

For example if the parent was 400px in height and the child 100px in height we’d need 150px of padding on both the top and bottom.

150 + 150 + 100 = 400

Using % could throw things off in this case unless our % values corresponded to exactly 150px.

This method works anywhere. The downside is that depending on the specifics of your project you may need to do a little math. However if you’re falling in line with the idea of developing flexible layouts where your measurements are all relative you can avoid the math.

Note: This method works by setting paddings on the outer elements. You can flip things and instead set equal margins on the inner elements. I tend to use padding, but I’ve also used margins with success. Which you choose would depend on the specifics of your project.

source

share|improve this answer
    
This kind of worked, Except it centered all of the text in the footer-top-bullets div, not in their individual divs. So now all the text is overlapping. –  Samuraisoulification Dec 28 '12 at 4:06
    
you can still add some css to the text –  Ivo Jonkers Dec 28 '12 at 4:07
    
IF you look here, jsfiddle.net/wgSEw/4 you can see that the text is all in one spot now. though centered, I need it vertically centered, and spread out evenly accross the parent div. –  Samuraisoulification Dec 28 '12 at 4:08
    
I got it now, from removing the css that edited the horizontal placing of it. Now it works, thanks a lot! –  Samuraisoulification Dec 28 '12 at 4:09
    
for the next time you can also use an <ul> </ul> with <li></li> in it –  Ivo Jonkers Dec 28 '12 at 4:10

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