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  1. query taking too much time to execute like around 130 mins.
  2. table having indexes but query is not using indexes.
  3. table size is around 30 millions of records.
  4. please help me to rewrite the query by changing (or),(and) conditions .
  5. The query is not using in normal execution so we tried with force index but no luck.

Query:

SELECT customer_history.customer_id,
        customer_history.row_mod,
        customer_history.row_create,
        customer_history.event_id,
        customer_history.event_type,
        customer_history.new_value,
        customer_history.old_value
FROM customer_history FORCE INDEX (customer_history_n2)
WHERE customer_id >= 1
        AND customer_id < 5000000
        AND (customer_history.row_mod >= '2012-10-01')
        OR (
                customer_history.row_create >= '2012-10-01'
                AND customer_history.row_create < '2012-10-13'
                );


Table structure

    CREATE TABLE `customer_history` (
      `customer_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
      `row_mod` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
      `row_create` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
      `event_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
      `event_type` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
      `new_value` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
      `old_value` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
      KEY `customer_id1` (`customer_id`),
      KEY `new_value_n1` (`new_value`),
      KEY `customer_history_n1` (`row_create`),
      KEY `customer_history_n2` (`row_mod`)
    ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

Explain Plan:

+----+-------------+------------------+------+---------------------+------+---------+------+----------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table            | type | possible_keys       | key  | key_len | ref  | rows     | Extra       |
+----+-------------+------------------+------+---------------------+------+---------+------+----------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | customer_history | ALL  | customer_history_n2 | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 18490530 | Using where |
+----+-------------+------------------+------+---------------------+------+---------+------+----------+-------------+
1 row in set (0
share|improve this question
    
You have to combine your keys into a multi-column index, to take advantage of a proper index for that kind of query – Bryan Dec 28 '12 at 5:19
2  
What do you get if you put an EXPLAIN in front of that query? Are you absolutely positively sure that this is the query you're running, and you're not leaving out any JOIN statements just for convenience? Also, why are you using the FORCE INDEX option? – King Skippus Dec 28 '12 at 5:29
    
Can you run SHOW TABLE STATUS and SHOW INDEXES for that table? Index selection depends upon cardinality and it may be a simple case of running OPTIMIZE on that table – Dancrumb Dec 28 '12 at 5:41
    
What happened? Why did you unmark my answer as the correct one? Did you find something else that wasn't related to the FORCE INDEX issue that resolved your problem? – King Skippus Dec 28 '12 at 14:31
    
sorry ,your answer is correct.when i am using force index .it was working fine. – mithuna kous Dec 31 '12 at 9:36

You could try to split this query in 2 parts:

SELECT customer_history.customer_id,
        customer_history.row_mod,
        customer_history.row_create,
        customer_history.event_id,
        customer_history.event_type,
        customer_history.new_value,
        customer_history.old_value
FROM customer_history
WHERE customer_id >= 1
        AND customer_id < 5000000
        AND (customer_history.row_mod >= '2012-10-01')

And

SELECT customer_history.customer_id,
        customer_history.row_mod,
        customer_history.row_create,
        customer_history.event_id,
        customer_history.event_type,
        customer_history.new_value,
        customer_history.old_value
FROM customer_history
WHERE  customer_history.row_create >= '2012-10-01'
       AND customer_history.row_create < '2012-10-13';

And see which one of them is taking longer to execute and optimize them. In order to obtain the same resultset as the first query, you can either UNION those 2 queries in MySQL, or simply execute them individually from your application layer and join the resultsets there.

share|improve this answer

Ah, I think I know what your issue is. According to the MySQL documentation:

By specifying USE INDEX (index_list), you can tell MySQL to use only one of the named indexes to find rows in the table. The alternative syntax IGNORE INDEX (index_list) can be used to tell MySQL to not use some particular index or indexes. These hints are useful if EXPLAIN shows that MySQL is using the wrong index from the list of possible indexes.

You can also use FORCE INDEX, which acts like USE INDEX (index_list) but with the addition that a table scan is assumed to be very expensive. In other words, a table scan is used only if there is no way to use one of the given indexes to find rows in the table.

In other words, by using FORCE INDEX, you're telling MySQL to only use the customer_history_n2 index and skip over all of the other available indexes. You need to remove the FORCE INDEX clause from your query, or else specify it as this instead so that it will use the indexes for the other columns that are available:

SELECT customer_history.customer_id,
    customer_history.row_mod,
    customer_history.row_create,
    customer_history.event_id,
    customer_history.event_type,
    customer_history.new_value,
    customer_history.old_value
FROM customer_history
    FORCE INDEX (customer_history_n2, customer_history_n1, customer_id1)
WHERE customer_id >= 1
    AND customer_id < 5000000
    AND (customer_history.row_mod >= '2012-10-01')
    OR (
        customer_history.row_create >= '2012-10-01'
        AND customer_history.row_create < '2012-10-13' );
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, with 30 million records, you might want to SERIOUSLY consider some horizontal partitioning of your database. If you frequently query your database for all dates within, for example, a month, you can partition it by range. I suggest reading this article for more information, as it can have a seriously positive impact on your database's performance. dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/partitioning.html – King Skippus Dec 28 '12 at 5:55

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