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Im new to python and programming in general and I came across this problem while fiddling around with a simple while loop. The loop takes input to evaluate two possible passwords:

    print('Enter password')
    passEntry = input()

    while passEntry !='juice' or 'juice2':
      print('Access Denied')
      passEntry = input()
      print(passEntry)

    print('Access Granted')

It doesnt seem to be accepting juice or juice2 as valid.

Also just accepting one password like:

    while passEntry != 'juice' :

will not work, while:

    while passEntry !='juice' :

works fine. I cant seem to find the reason for these issues (Only difference between the latter two is the space after the =). Any help is appreciated.

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This may not reason of error I guess! –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 28 '12 at 5:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First, you should use Python's getpass module to get a password portably. For example:

import getpass
passEntry = getpass.getpass("Enter password")

Then, the code you have written to guard the while loop:

while passEntry != 'juice' or 'juice2':

gets interpreted by the Python interpreter as a while loop with the guard expression

(passEntry != 'juice') or 'juice2'

This is always true because regardless of whether passEntry equals "juice" or not, "juice2" will be considered as true when interpreted as a boolean.

In Python, the best way to test membership is to use the in operator, which works for a variety of data types such as a list or a set or a tuple. For example, a list:

while passEntry not in ['juice', 'juice2']:
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you can use

while passEntry not in ['juice' ,'juice2']:
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How about:

while passEntry !='juice' and passEntry!= 'juice2':

and using raw_input() instead of input()?

input() evaluates the input as if it were Python code.

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Yes this was it for the first part, made logical error using or instead of and. Thanks –  baker641 Dec 28 '12 at 5:54
    
raw_input() didnt seem to work however –  baker641 Dec 28 '12 at 6:02

passEntry !='juice' or 'juice2' means (pass != 'juice') or ('juice2'). "juice2" is a nonempty string, so it is always true. Thus your condition is always true.

You want to do passEntry != 'juice' and passEntry != 'juice2', or more nicely passEntry not in ('juice', 'juice2').

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Does this work?

while passEntry !='juice' and passEntry !='juice2':
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Your error is in the way you wrote the while statement.

while passEntry !='juice' or 'juice2':

That line will always be true, when read by the python interpreter. And also instead of:

passEntry = input()

Use:

passEntry = raw_input()

(Unless you are using Python 3)

the input in Python 2 evals your input.

This will be the proper code:

print('Enter password')
passEntry = raw_input()

while passEntry != 'juice' and passEntry != 'juice2':
    print('Access Denied')
    passEntry = raw_input()
    print(passEntry)

print('Access Granted')
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, im running python3, so i guess thats why raw_input() gave me problems. Thanks –  baker641 Dec 28 '12 at 18:41

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