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How can I implement a substring function such as the following that returns the substring but without using malloc() in the process so I don't have to worry about freeing the associated memory elsewhere in my code using the free() function. Is this even possible?

const char *substring(const char *string, int position, int length)
{
    char *pointer;
    int c;

    pointer = malloc(length+1);

    if (pointer == NULL)
    {
        printf("Unable to allocate memory.\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    for (c = 0 ; c < position -1 ; c++)
        string++;

    for (c = 0 ; c < length ; c++)
    {
        *(pointer+c) = *string;
        string++;
    }

    *(pointer+c) = '\0';

    return substr;
}

UPDATE: 30 DEC 2012

Having considered all the answers and comments it's clear that essentially what I'm trying to do is create a dynamically sized array (i.e. the substring) and that is not possible in C without somewhere along the way having to use some kind of malloc() function and a subsequent free() call on the substring pointer or without the aid of a garbage collector. I attempted to integrate the libgc garbage collector as kindly suggested by @elhadi but so far have not been able to get this to work in my Xcode project. So I have opted to stick with using the following code with malloc() and free().

char * subStr(const char* srcString, const int offset, const int len)
{
    char * sub = (char*)malloc(len+1);
    memcpy(sub, srcString + offset, len);
    sub[len] = 0;
    return sub;
}

int main()
{    
    const char * message = "hello universe";
    char * sub = subStr( message, 6, 8 );
    printf( "substring: [%s]", sub );
    free(sub);
}
share|improve this question
    
do you want to modify the original string? –  perreal Dec 28 '12 at 8:01
    
@perreal I do not want to modify the original string. –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 8:03

5 Answers 5

I see two options:

If you can destroy the source string (usually a bad thing):

{
    string[ position + length] = 0;
    return & string[ position ];
}

Note: (see Cole Johnsons note: free no longer works on the returned pointer!)

If you can't modify the source string: Modify your methods signature so that the caller has to worry about it:

const char *substring(const char *source, char* destination, int position, int length)

And put the modified string into destination (and return it).

And do not even think about this:

const char *substring(const char *string, int position, int length)
{
    char *pointer;
    int c;
    static char modifiedString[256];
 ...
    return modifiedString;
}

Using a static variable inside the function for the modified results... (This is not thread-safe (not re-entrant!) )

share|improve this answer
    
Would I still have to use free() as some point in the caller? –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 8:32
1  
If you change the pointer (fist example), free will no longer work. –  Cole Johnson Dec 28 '12 at 8:56
const char *substring(const char *string, char *substr, int position, int length)
{
    int c;

    for (c = 0 ; c < position -1 ; c++)
        string++;

    for (c = 0 ; c < length ; c++)
    {
        *(substr+c) = *string;
        string++;
    }

    *(substr+c) = '\0';

    return substr;
}

calling function...

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    char substr[10];

    substring("hello! World", &substr[0], 2, 4);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
@NSDigital, you can use this function without having to define a local variable by using a compound literal: substr((char [size+1]){0}, str, pos, size). If you don't want to retype the crude compound literal definition every time you can use a macro that always provides the first argument. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 28 '12 at 8:41
    
Thanks @JensGustedt, could you provide some more detail? How would I then access the value of the substring? Could i use printf() to see it? –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 8:56
    
I like the macro approach @JensGustedt but in some cases in my code the substring length is determined by an expression e.g. (myVariable+position) and so the compilere gives the error "Variable sized object may not be initialized." –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 10:31
    
@NSDigital, yes, if this is a variable length array (VLA) you'd have to define this as an uninitialized variable, there would be no way around this. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 28 '12 at 10:53
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a local buffer (an auto array) and a function like this:

void substr(char *dst, const char *src, size_t loc, size_t len)
{
    memcpy(dst, src + loc, len);
    dst[len] = 0;
}

Call it like this:

const size_t size = 3;
char buf[size + 1]; // this is an auto array, it will be "freed" at the end of the scope
substr(buf, "abcdFOObar", 4, size);

Always ensure the buffer is at least len + 1 bytes long to avoid buffer overflow errors.

share|improve this answer
    
what if the size of the substring will vary? –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 8:14
    
+1 for better implementation of function –  Mario The Spoon Dec 28 '12 at 8:17
    
@NSDigital What do you mean by "if it will vary"? –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 8:18
    
I think my reasoning is that I'd prefer not to have to declare a buffer everytime I want to get a substring, e.g. I often use substr() as an argument to a logging function log("some info",substr(someStr,3,4)); –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 8:27
    
@NSDigital In that case, you have to use malloc(). Or redesign your code. –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 8:39

You can use a static string like this

#define MAX_SZ    4096 /* example */
char *substr(const char* buffer, const int offset, int len)
{
    static char tmp[MAX_SZ];
    memset(tmp, 0, MAX_SZ);
    if (len >= MAX_SZ) {
        len = MAX_SZ-1; // you should know that your string never exceed MAX_SZ
    }
    memcpy(tmp, buffer + offset, len);
    return tmp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This sounds interesting, could you elaborate on this? Would this approach allow me to do something like printf("substring: %s",substr(src,2,5)); –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 8:53
    
Does the line static char tmp[MAX_SZ]; mean that memory will be allocated for the full length of 4096? –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 9:03
1  
yes of course, if you need some thing dynamic should use c++ string or stay in c and use a garbage collector –  elhadi Dec 28 '12 at 9:39
1  
thread safe is, if you have two thread which call the same function substr at the same time, you will have a strange sub string as the work on the same buffer on the same time –  elhadi Dec 28 '12 at 9:51
1  
@Martin James: of course, it is dependant on how you compile, with/without thread, the compiler will choose thread-safe/not thread-safe malloc. so when compiling with -pthreads, it'll be thread safe. –  elhadi Dec 28 '12 at 22:24

You can use a garbage collector, you allocate the memory the first time, the garbage collector will free the memory when no needed.
you should include

#include "gc.h"

in the main you should make something like

GC_INIT();  /* Optional on Linux/X86;*/

and your substr function is:

char *substr(const char* buffer, const int offset, int len)
{
    char sub = (char*)GC_MALLOC(len+1);
    memcpy(sub, buffer + offset, len);
    sub[len] = 0;
    return sub;
}

you should link with libgc.a

share|improve this answer
    
How does the GC know when the object is not needed? Presumably when the caller has finished executing? –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 9:58
    
it works like in java garbage collector –  elhadi Dec 28 '12 at 10:04
    
Is this approach thread safe? –  user745229 Dec 28 '12 at 10:32
    
You can compile GC to support threads and to be thread-safe, see: hpl.hp.com/personal/Hans_Boehm/gc/simple_example.html or linux.die.net/man/3/gc –  elhadi Dec 28 '12 at 22:27
    
@NSDigital It is very dangerous to edit a string. What if its a string literal editing the same is not allowed and it will result into a segmentation fault. –  nimish Dec 29 '12 at 5:21

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