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I have a class of div's with the class footer-list, and I need to change all the text of the li to be white.

The html looks like:

     <div id="footer-middle-left-right">
                        <div class="footer-list">
                            <ul>
                                <li>FAFSA Guide</li>
                                <li>Scholarship Finder</li>
                                <li>State Education</li>
                                <li>Ready UP</li>
                            </ul>
                        </div>
                        <div class="footer-list">
                            <ul>
                                <li>Terms of Service</li>
                                <li>Privacy Settings</li>
                                <li>FAQ</li>
                            </ul>
                        </div>
                        <div class="footer-list">
                            <ul>
                                <li>How it Works</li>
                                <li>Submit a School</li>
                                <li>Submit a Professor</li>
                                <li>Report a Misspelling</li>
                            </ul>
                        </div>
</div>

Obviously adding another class element to all the li is overkill, and not maintainable really. Im pretty new to css and can't figure out the correct way to select all the li in the classes.

I tried something like:

.footer-list.li{
     color: white;
}

to no avail. Any help about this, suggested reading, or any other css advice would be greatly appreciated! Im more of a back-end guy so this is the first I've really had to worry about css part of this, so it's gotten me a bit lost!

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually you are adding a . before li which makes it a class so try this

.footer-list li { /This selects li inside the class .footer-list */
    color: #ffffff;   /* Even white is fine */
 }

Or better be specific and use

.footer-list ul li { /* Will apply to li which are inside ul which is inside .footer-list only */
    color: #ffffff;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I was kind of on the right track, I though that the li were either automatically a class, and therefor accessed by the .li, or being the programmer I am, saw it as an element of the footer-list class and therefore like in php used .li –  Samuraisoulification Dec 28 '12 at 8:38
    
nah that makes .li a class, it's just element so you need to refer directly using tag name, if you add . or # it makes id's and class so if you want to target for example span inside a div, you write div span {styles} but this will apply to all spans inside div tag, but if you want to target span inside a specific div you need to write it like div.class_name span {style goes here} –  Mr. Alien Dec 28 '12 at 8:42
    
Alright, think I got it! Thanks for the help! CSS is very hard I think! I'd rather be doing real programming anyday! –  Samuraisoulification Dec 28 '12 at 8:47
    
@Samuraisoulification It's not that tough, just give it some time and you'll get through it ;) –  Mr. Alien Dec 28 '12 at 8:49
    
Yeah, it's getting a bit easier than it used to be, but I wasn't expecting it to be this difficult. Haha, Ill hang in there! –  Samuraisoulification Dec 28 '12 at 8:50
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Your selector:

.footer-list.li{
     color: white;
}

Says "select elements with BOTH classes footer-list and li."

This is incorrect for what you want, you have to add a space between them and remove the dot:

.footer-list li{
     color: white;
}

This will select any <li> within any element with the class footer-list :)

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Just remove the dot before li

.footer-list li{
     color: white;
}
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