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I am learning backbone.js following this tutorial, but I run into problem understanding the first example:

(function($){
  var ListView = Backbone.View.extend({
    ...
    initialize: function(){
      _.bindAll(this, 'render'); // fixes loss of context for 'this' within methods

       this.render(); // not all views are self-rendering. This one is.
    },
    ...
  });
  ...
 })(jQuery);

Q1: Why use (function($){})(jQuery); instead of a perfectly fine working (function(){})();?

Q2: What does _.bindAll(this, 'render') do? How does it fixes loss of context for 'this' within method?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Q1: by passing jquery in as a parameter you allow yourself 2 things:

  1. if the need of using 2 versions of jquery arises - you are prepared
  2. module pattern is probably better thought of as something well encapsulated and with well defined dependencies, so by declaring that jquery is a parameter - you declare clear dependency. Granted there are other ways of doing it (like RequireJS), but this is also a way

Q2: bindAll is a utility method from Underscore.js that binds this for a specific method - thus, when that method is invoked (as a callback for instance) the correct this would be used inside of it.

For example:

(function($){
  var ListView = Backbone.View.extend({
    ...
    initialize: function(){
        // fixes loss of context for 'this' within methods
        _.bindAll(this, 'render', 'makestuff'); 

        this.render(); // not all views are self-rendering. This one is.
    },
    ...
    makestuff : function() { 
        ... 
        this.stuff = ... // some action on the list's instance
    }
  });
  ...
 })(jQuery);

and in some part of your code you doing something like:

var list = new ListView({...});
$('#button').on('click', list.makestuff);

this in makestuff method is a reference to the above list and not whatever context the on function is in when makestuff is actually invoked inside it.

The actual implementation relies on using apply and call functions to bind the context of function's execution to a specific object.

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checked you for more detailed explanation, thanks –  CarlLee Dec 28 '12 at 9:04

(function($){})(jQuery) passes jQuery to the self executing which is using it as $. This makes sure you can safely use the $ symbol inside the closure without having to worry about interference with other libraries or even other versions of jQuery. A common example for this practice would also be passing in window and document and then using shorthands inside the closure:

(function(w, d, $){
$(w).resize(function({}); //equals $(window) now
})(window, document, jQuery);

underscore's _.bindAll does the following:

Binds a number of methods on the object, specified by methodNames, to be run in the context of that object whenever they are invoked. Very handy for binding functions that are going to be used as event handlers, which would otherwise be invoked with a fairly useless this. If no methodNames are provided, all of the object's function properties will be bound to it.

See the annotated source for the how.

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thanks, the other answer explained in more details, sorry I chosed him –  CarlLee Dec 28 '12 at 9:05

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