Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
PHP Math Precision

This is a very simple rounding of a number, but for some reason it chooses to ignore the last digit rather than rounding up correctly.

$number = 4886.94 * 1.25;
$number = round($number,2);
echo "Test: ".$number."<br />";

The total number is 6108.675 but it rounds down to .67 rather than .68.

But if I write it out directly likes this:

$number = 6108.675;
$number = round($number,2);
echo "Test: ".$number."<br />";

It now rounds up to .68 correctly.

What am I missing?

Update:

This is undoubtedly a "hack", but alas...

$number = substr($number,0,strpos($number,".")+4);   
$number = round($number,2);

It gives me the 3 digits that I can round up correctly.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Charles, Ja͢ck, Frank van Puffelen, Mike Kwan, Daij-Djan Dec 28 '12 at 13:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

You get different results because (as far as PHP is concerned) you have different numbers:

<?php
ini_set('precision', 20);
var_dump( 4886.94 * 1.25 );
var_dump( 6108.675 );

...

float(6108.6749999999992724)
float(6108.6750000000001819)

That's how computers work ;-)

share|improve this answer
1  
an ini_set is better than a thousand words, bravo – pocesar Dec 28 '12 at 9:01
    
I assume the downvote is for not linking the manual page for round() :-? – Álvaro González Dec 28 '12 at 9:16
    
It certainly explains everything, but also makes my life somewhat more troublesome heh. Thank you :) – user1934039 Dec 28 '12 at 9:19
    
Yeah, you chose a bad day to quit smoking :) – Álvaro González Dec 28 '12 at 9:21

http://php.net/manual/en/function.round.php

The third parameter. You need to use PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP

Outputs:

php > $num = 4886.94 * 1.25;
php > $new_num = round($num, 2, PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP);
php > echo $new_num . PHP_EOL;
6108.68
php > 

On PHP 5.4.6

share|improve this answer
2  
reading the manual for the win – Dagon Dec 28 '12 at 8:57
1  
I believe it's the default anyway, according to your link? – Lukx Dec 28 '12 at 8:57
    
Lukx is correct. Which version of PHP are you using OP? in 5.4.6 I get the answer you're looking for without adding the third param. – David Harris Dec 28 '12 at 8:58
1  
@Lukx, note the changelog at the bottom of the manpage -- the mode param is new, so HALF_UP would only be the default starting in 5.3 and later. The behavior prior to that is not defined for earlier versions, it seems. – Charles Dec 28 '12 at 8:59
1  
@Charles: That is correct. However, although not truly representive, my company's PHP 5.2 Build on Debian (production use) does behave as if the actually used mode was HALF_UP. – Lukx Dec 28 '12 at 9:05

You can use like this-

<?php
echo round(9.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP);   // 10
echo round(9.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_DOWN); // 9
echo round(9.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_EVEN); // 10
echo round(9.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_ODD);  // 9

echo round(8.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP);   // 9
echo round(8.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_DOWN); // 8
echo round(8.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_EVEN); // 8
echo round(8.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_ODD);  // 9
?> 

Additionally PHP provide function like ceil() and floor();

share|improve this answer
    
is it a copy paste – Jonathan de M. Dec 28 '12 at 8:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.