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I found the following syntax as a VB.NET property and I'm trying to convert it to c#, but I'm not sure how to accomplish that.

Public Property SomeText(ByVal someEnumThing as SomeEnum) As String
    Get
        Select Case someEnumThing
            //figure out what string to return
        End Select
    End Get
    Set(ByVal Value as String)
        Select Case someEnumThing
            //figure out what string to set
        End Select
    End Set
End Property

I've never seen a property done like this before, any ideas?

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C# does not support "indexed properties", that is, properties which take parameters. VB does. FYI, in C# 4 we will allow certain uses of indexed properties on COM objects; it is hard to call indexed properties on legacy COM objects that were designed to be called from VB. But we do not plan to support definition of new indexed properties in C# at this time. – Eric Lippert Sep 10 '09 at 20:29
up vote 12 down vote accepted

I guess you're referring to the arguments for the property. Well, as far as I know, C# only supports them for indexers, which cannot have a name (e.g. this[SomeEnum someEnumThing] {}).

If you want to get a similar behavior, you can create a helper class with an indexer property and use it to expose the "name" of the property:

public class YourClass {
	public struct SomeTextProperty {
		private readonly YourClass owner;

		internal SomeTextProperty(YourClass owner) {
			this.owner = owner;
		}

		public string this[SomeEnum someEnumThing] {
			get {
				return owner.GetSomeText(someEnumThing);
			}
			set {
				owner.SetSomeText(someEnumThing, value);
			}
		}
	}

	public SomeTextProperty SomeText {
		get {
			return new SomeTextProperty(this);
		}
	}

	private string GetSomeText(SomeEnum someEnumThing) {
		// implementation to get it
	}

	private void SetSomeText(SomeEnum someEnumThing, string value) {
		// implementation to set it
	}
}
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2  
+1 I'd wager this is what the OP is referring to. – Ben M Sep 10 '09 at 17:52
1  
FWIW, Ayende wrote a small trick to "get" named indexers in C# in his Rhino.Commons library. – R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 10 '09 at 17:55
    
@Lucero You nailed it, I was hoping there would be a c# equivalent, but I'm thinking I'm just screwed now. =( – Joseph Sep 10 '09 at 17:56
    
+1 This is the right answer. – Andrew Hare Sep 10 '09 at 17:56
    
@Joseph: well, not really. You could conceivably have another property to represent the SomeEnum parameter. Then inside the get/set as provided by @Andrew Hare you would reference the new property. – Ahmad Mageed Sep 10 '09 at 17:57

Hmm... maybe the switch statement?

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It is impossible to create a Property in C# which has arguments, unless it's the default property:

public double this[int index]
{
  get {...}
  set {...}
}

Just one of those areas where VB differs from C#. It is not recommended to use syntax like this since you will not be able to use that property from a C# project that references this assembly.

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That's what I was afraid of... – Joseph Sep 10 '09 at 17:55

If you're talking about the fact that the property is parameterized...

There's no direct translation for this in c# that I know of. Basically this is carryover from VB6 where you could make this weird quasi-collection property for a class. The easiest way to get similar functionality is to create a dictionary object and either publicly expose it or create an accessor. Where the VB code accesses this property like Class.SomeText("SomeKey") your C# code will become Class.SomeDictionaryProperty["SomeKey"]

Unfortunately this still isn't quite the same since the collection accessor won't be able to "see" the index value. This has been a minor source of frustration for me as well in the past coming from a VB background.

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The Select Case will be a switch statement. Is that what you are specifically referring to?

EDIT: here's what I was referring to in my comment to @Lucero's answer to get close to the VB.NET syntax.

private SomeEnum SomeEnumThing { get; set; }
public string SomeText {
    get {
        switch (SomeEnumThing) {
        //figure out what string to return
        }
    }
    set {
        switch (SomeEnumThing) {
        //figure out what string to set
        }
   }

}

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