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This is situation:

if count items is either 0,1,5,7,8,9,10 then string = "string one"
if count items is either 2,3,4 then string = "string two"

I tried with (inside cs razor view)

@if (@item.TotalImages == 1 || 5 || 7 || 8 || 9 || 10)
{
   string mystring = "string one"
}

but I'm getting this error

operator || cannot be applied to operands of type bool or int

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7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Or perhaps

var accepted = new HashSet<int>(new[] {1, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10});

@if (accepted.Contains(item.TotalImages))
{
   string mystring = "string one"
}
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1  
+1 for using HashSet instead of List. –  phoog Dec 28 '12 at 9:27
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You have wrong syntax for or operator.

Change to.

@if (@item.TotalImages == 1 || @item.TotalImages == 5)
{
   string mystring = "string one"
}
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Take a closer look at the error message:

operator || cannot be applied to operands of type bool or int

And your code:

@if (@item.TotalImages == 1 || 5)

You're applying the || operator to a bool (@item.TotalImages == 1) and an int (5). 'True or 5' doesn't make sense. Neither does 'False or 5'

Basically, all you need to do is make both sides of the || operator booleans.

@if (@item.TotalImages == 1 || @item.TotalImages == 5)

There are (of course) lots of other clever ways to do this, but that's probably the most straight forward.

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1  
+1 for explanation + solution instead of just the solution –  Marjan Venema Dec 28 '12 at 9:43
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The In extension method could be a syntactic sugar for a situation like this:

public static class CLRExtensions
{
    public static bool In<T>(this T source, params T[] list)
    {
        return list.Contains(source);
    }
}

So basically instead of using multiple or operator, you could simply write:

@if (@item.TotalImages.In(1, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10)
{
}
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ok, beat me in seconds. –  Danny Chen Dec 28 '12 at 9:22
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You may end up with a very big 'if' statement if you want to check all those possibilities. A terser way to do it using LINQ would be:

@if ((new List<int>{ 0, 1, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 }).Contains(@item.TotalImages))
{
    string mystring = "string one"
}

This way you can more easily see and maintain the list of numbers to check against (or, indeed pass them in from somewhere else).

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The "Contains" method of HashSet<T> is more efficient than that of List<T>. –  phoog Dec 28 '12 at 9:28
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Between "||" always must be an expression, that can be transleted to Boolean (true / false):

@if (@item.TotalImages == 1 || @item.TotalImages == 5 || @item.TotalImages == 7 || @item.TotalImages == 8 || @item.TotalImages == 9 || @item.TotalImages == 10)
    {
       string mystring = "string one"
    }
@else @if(@item.TotalImages == 2 || @item.TotalImages == 3 || @item.TotalImages == 4)
    {
       string mystirng = "string two"
    }
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I'd use a switch:

@switch (@item.TotalImages)
{
    case 0:
    case 1:
    case 5:
    case 7:
    case 8:
    case 9:
    case 10:
        s = "string one";
        break;
    case 2:
    case 3:
    case 4:
        s = "string two";
        break;
    default:
        throw new Exception("Unexpected image count");
}

Oddly, nobody has suggested a dictionary:

private string stringOne = "string one";
private string stringTwo = "string two";

private Dictionary<int, string> _map = new Dictionary<int, string>
{
    { 0, stringOne },
    { 1, stringOne },
    { 2, stringTwo },
    { 3, stringTwo },
    { 4, stringTwo },
    { 5, stringOne },
    { 7, stringOne },
    { 8, stringOne },
    { 9, stringOne },
    { 10, stringOne },
}

then

@var s = _map[@item.TotalImages];

This approach makes it easier to see, for example, that you have not handled the case where TotalImages == 6.

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Why would you favour a switch statement as opposed to the other solutions proposed? Just interested... –  Holf Dec 28 '12 at 9:27
1  
@Holf on the assumption that the compiler can do it more efficiently than I can. Also, some other answers mentioned maintainability. If the logic is subject to change, then I'd be more inclined to use a Dictionary<int, string> as it would be more flexible. –  phoog Dec 28 '12 at 9:31
    
Thanks, make sense. –  Holf Dec 28 '12 at 9:32
    
Why the down-vote? Care to comment, down-voter? –  Holf Dec 28 '12 at 9:46
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