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I want to to represent two numbers in A/B format,wWhere A and B are any integers. I want the decimal result in shortest format.

Examples:

  • The shortest decimal representation of 3/28 is "0.10(714285)".
  • Decimal representation of 1/7 is "0.(142857)"

How can I do this with C#?

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closed as off topic by flem, Hogan, Bertrand Marron, abbot, SWeko Dec 28 '12 at 15:57

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It looks like you're not asking for coding solution but rather an algorithm. I don't think this is the appropriate forum. Try the Mathematics site. –  flem Dec 28 '12 at 11:00
1  
@flem: The Mathematics site is for math students and professionals. Probably better not bother them with such trivialities. :) –  COME FROM Dec 28 '12 at 11:12
2  
Why is asking for an algorithm for converting rational numbers into a specific string representation off topic? –  Martin Liversage Dec 28 '12 at 18:06
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Hopefully, someone can convert this to C# code:

def get_decimal(a, b):
    result = str(a / b) + '.'
    r = a % b
    remainders = []
    while r not in remainders:
        remainders.append(r)
        result += str(10 * r / b)
        r = 10 * r % b
    return result

Some tests:

>>> get_decimal(1, 7)
'0.142857'
>>> get_decimal(10, 7)
'1.428571'
>>> get_decimal(3, 28)
'0.10714285'
>>> get_decimal(99099167, 990000000)
'0.100100168'

If you need the parentheses to indicate the repeating set of digits, then something like this:

def get_decimal(a, b):
    result = str(a / b) + '.'
    r = a % b
    remainders = []
    digits = []
    while r not in remainders:
        remainders.append(r)
        digits.append(str(10 * r / b))
        r = 10 * r % b
    start = remainders.index(r)
    result += ''.join(digits[0:start]) + '(' + ''.join(digits[start:]) + ')'
    return result

Some tests:

>>> get_decimal(1, 7)
'0.(142857)'
>>> get_decimal(10, 7)
'1.(428571)'
>>> get_decimal(3, 28)
'0.10(714285)'
>>> get_decimal(99099167, 990000000)
'0.1001001(68)'
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Does that work for 121 / 999? Should produce 0.(121). –  COME FROM Dec 28 '12 at 11:39
    
@COMEFROM Yes, get_decimal(121, 999) returns the string 0.(121). –  Susam Pal Dec 28 '12 at 12:23
    
Good, +1. Just didn't see it right a way. I should point out that what's done here is just good old long division applied to the remainder, probably taught at high or even primary level schools in many places. –  COME FROM Dec 28 '12 at 12:58
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I think you want to get result upto 2 decimal places...For this you can use

double result = 0.142857; 
int decimalPlaces = 2;//for two decimal places
double multiplier = Math.Pow(10, Convert.ToDouble(decimalPlaces));
result =  Math.Ceiling(result * multiplier) / multiplier;
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This doesn't answer the question. From 3/28 OP wants 0.10(714285) indicating the recurrence. –  flem Dec 28 '12 at 11:15
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