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I need to check if map contains any of the keys from a list, and if it does then return the first matching value. The naive approach that comes to mind is to do it in two nested loops:

Map<String, String> fields = new HashMap<String, String>();
fields.put("a", "value a");
fields.put("z", "value z");
String[] candidates = "a|b|c|d".split("|");
for (String key : fields.keySet()){
    for (String candidate : candidates) {
        if (key.equals(candidate)){
            return fields.get(key);
        }
    }
}

Is there a nicer and more efficient way, possibly one relying on the Java standard library?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Surely something like:

for (String candidate : candidates) {
     String result = fields.get(key);
     if (result != null) {
         return result;
     }
}

The above only performs one map lookup per candidate key. It avoids the separate test for presence plus extraction, since extracting a non-existant key will simply give you a null. Note (thanks Slanec) that a null value for a valid key is indistinguishable from a non-existant key for this solution.

I don't quite understand why you're performing the case conversion, btw.

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4  
This is as efficient as it can get, but it may get tricky if null is a permitted value in the Map. –  Slanec Dec 28 '12 at 11:09
3  
Interesting... Do I understand it correctly that the idea is to only use map.get() once instead of map.contains() + map.get() because that would avoid a second lookup? That's neat! –  ccpizza Dec 28 '12 at 11:11
3  
@NimChimpsky retainAll is descructive. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 28 '12 at 11:12
2  
@ccpizza - that's correct. Note Slanec's caveat re. null values in the map, though –  Brian Agnew Dec 28 '12 at 11:13
2  
@ccpizza Actually, yes, once, I think. In an application where we didn't have explicit control over the hashmap's content as it was user's configuration and we needed to capture a case where a setting was accessed (but not changed) or was reset to default. Anyway, there is a SO question for this. –  Slanec Dec 28 '12 at 11:31
for(String candidate : candidates) {
 if(fields.containsKey(candidate)) {
  return fields.get(candidate)
 }
}

the best way if null values are possibly in map, and if only the first detected key is required.

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My take:

Map<String, String> fields = new HashMap<String, String>();
fields.put("a", "value a");
fields.put("z", "value z");
String[] candidates = "a|b|c|d".split("|");
for (String candidate : candidates) {
    if (fields.containsKey(candidate)) {
        return fields.get(candidate);
    }
}
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Try

Set<String> keySet = new HashSet<String>(fields.keySet());    
keySet.retainAll(list);

so keySet is supposed to have all keys from HashMap which are mentioned in the list

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2  
This is, I believe, the shortest way. However, it may be not the fastest one since the looping ends at the first found result, but this continues its work till the end. –  Slanec Dec 28 '12 at 11:12
3  
@Slanec, yes it depends whether OP wants to get all keys or just first one. –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Dec 28 '12 at 11:13

Try as

    List list= Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3);
    HashMap map = new HashMap();
    map.put(1, 1);
    map.put(3, 3);
    Set set = new HashSet(map.keySet());
    set.retainAll(list);
    System.out.println(set);
    Object e = set.isEmpty() ? null : set.iterator().next();
    System.out.println(e);

output

[1, 3]
1
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Map<String, String> fields = new HashMap<String, String>();
fields.put("a", "value a");
fields.put("z", "value z");
String[] candidates = "a|b|c|d".split("|");
List<String> canList = Arrays.asList(candidates );
for (String key : fields.keySet()){

if (canList .contains(key)) {
return fields.get(key);
}

}
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1  
Note : canList.contains is linear in time. –  Srinivas Dec 28 '12 at 11:06

You can use a single loop if you assume the key of the map are already in lower case, in the same way you assume the lookup values are in lower case.

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